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Change in Body Weight from Age 20 Years Is a Powerful Determinant of the Metabolic Syndrome

Lind, Lars; Elmståhl, Sölve LU and Ärnlöv, Johan (2017) In Metabolic syndrome and related disorders 15(3). p.112-117
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Higher body weight is a well-known determinant of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. It is however less well studied how the change in weight from age 20 years to middle age or old age affects MetS development.

METHODS: In the community-based EpiHealth (n = 19,000, age range 45 to 75 years, 56% females) and PIVUS (n = 1000, all aged 70 years, 50% females) studies, the participants were asked about their body weight at age 20 years. Data were collected to determine MetS prevalence (NCEP ATP III criteria).

RESULTS: In EpiHealth, the probability of having MetS increased fairly linearly with increasing weight from age 20 in the obese [odds ratios (OR) 1.04 per kg change in weight, 95% confidence... (More)

BACKGROUND: Higher body weight is a well-known determinant of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. It is however less well studied how the change in weight from age 20 years to middle age or old age affects MetS development.

METHODS: In the community-based EpiHealth (n = 19,000, age range 45 to 75 years, 56% females) and PIVUS (n = 1000, all aged 70 years, 50% females) studies, the participants were asked about their body weight at age 20 years. Data were collected to determine MetS prevalence (NCEP ATP III criteria).

RESULTS: In EpiHealth, the probability of having MetS increased fairly linearly with increasing weight from age 20 in the obese [odds ratios (OR) 1.04 per kg change in weight, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.05, P < 0.0001], as well as in the overweight (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.14-1.17, P < 0.0001) and normal-weight (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.14-1.21, P < 0.0001), subjects after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) at age 20, alcohol intake, smoking, education, and exercise habits. Also in the PIVUS study, the change in weight over 50 years was related to prevalent MetS (OR 1.08 per kg change in weight, 95% CI 1.06-1.10, P < 0.0001). In both studies, self-reported BMI at age 20 was related to prevalent MetS.

CONCLUSION: Self-reported weight gain from age 20 was strongly and independently associated with prevalent MetS both in middle age or old age. Interestingly, this relationship was not restricted only to obese subjects. Our data provide additional support for the importance of maintaining a stable weight throughout life.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
body weight, epidemiology, longitudinal, metabolic syndrome, obesity
in
Metabolic syndrome and related disorders
volume
15
issue
3
pages
6 pages
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85040514278
ISSN
1557-8518
DOI
10.1089/met.2016.0121
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fa3f9df7-0e86-4080-bfaa-ba9da06ada77
date added to LUP
2018-02-05 16:00:50
date last changed
2018-02-05 16:00:50
@article{fa3f9df7-0e86-4080-bfaa-ba9da06ada77,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Higher body weight is a well-known determinant of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. It is however less well studied how the change in weight from age 20 years to middle age or old age affects MetS development.</p><p>METHODS: In the community-based EpiHealth (n = 19,000, age range 45 to 75 years, 56% females) and PIVUS (n = 1000, all aged 70 years, 50% females) studies, the participants were asked about their body weight at age 20 years. Data were collected to determine MetS prevalence (NCEP ATP III criteria).</p><p>RESULTS: In EpiHealth, the probability of having MetS increased fairly linearly with increasing weight from age 20 in the obese [odds ratios (OR) 1.04 per kg change in weight, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.05, P &lt; 0.0001], as well as in the overweight (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.14-1.17, P &lt; 0.0001) and normal-weight (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.14-1.21, P &lt; 0.0001), subjects after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) at age 20, alcohol intake, smoking, education, and exercise habits. Also in the PIVUS study, the change in weight over 50 years was related to prevalent MetS (OR 1.08 per kg change in weight, 95% CI 1.06-1.10, P &lt; 0.0001). In both studies, self-reported BMI at age 20 was related to prevalent MetS.</p><p>CONCLUSION: Self-reported weight gain from age 20 was strongly and independently associated with prevalent MetS both in middle age or old age. Interestingly, this relationship was not restricted only to obese subjects. Our data provide additional support for the importance of maintaining a stable weight throughout life.</p>},
  author       = {Lind, Lars and Elmståhl, Sölve and Ärnlöv, Johan},
  issn         = {1557-8518},
  keyword      = {body weight,epidemiology,longitudinal,metabolic syndrome,obesity},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {112--117},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Metabolic syndrome and related disorders},
  title        = {Change in Body Weight from Age 20 Years Is a Powerful Determinant of the Metabolic Syndrome},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/met.2016.0121},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2017},
}