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Guidelines and Recommendations for Laboratory Analysis in the Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

Sacks, David B. ; Arnold, Mark ; Bakris, George L. ; Bruns, David E. ; Horvath, Andrea R. ; Lernmark, Åke LU orcid ; Metzger, Boyd E. ; Nathan, David M. and Kirkman, M. Sue (2023) In Clinical Chemistry 69(8). p.808-868
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Numerous laboratory tests are used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus. The quality of the scientific evidence supporting the use of these assays varies substantially. APPROACH: An expert committee compiled evidence-based recommendations for laboratory analysis in screening, diagnosis, or monitoring of diabetes. The overall quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendations were evaluated. The draft consensus recommendations were evaluated by invited reviewers and presented for public comment. Suggestions were incorporated as deemed appropriate by the authors (see Acknowledgments). The guidelines were reviewed by the Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine Committee and the Board of Directors of the... (More)

BACKGROUND: Numerous laboratory tests are used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus. The quality of the scientific evidence supporting the use of these assays varies substantially. APPROACH: An expert committee compiled evidence-based recommendations for laboratory analysis in screening, diagnosis, or monitoring of diabetes. The overall quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendations were evaluated. The draft consensus recommendations were evaluated by invited reviewers and presented for public comment. Suggestions were incorporated as deemed appropriate by the authors (see Acknowledgments). The guidelines were reviewed by the Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine Committee and the Board of Directors of the American Association of Clinical Chemistry and by the Professional Practice Committee of the American Diabetes Association. CONTENT: Diabetes can be diagnosed by demonstrating increased concentrations of glucose in venous plasma or increased hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c) in the blood. Glycemic control is monitored by the people with diabetes measuring their own blood glucose with meters and/or with continuous interstitial glucose monitoring (CGM) devices and also by laboratory analysis of Hb A1c. The potential roles of noninvasive glucose monitoring, genetic testing, and measurement of ketones, autoantibodies, urine albumin, insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide are addressed. SUMMARY: The guidelines provide specific recommendations based on published data or derived from expert consensus. Several analytes are found to have minimal clinical value at the present time, and measurement of them is not recommended.

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author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Chemistry
volume
69
issue
8
pages
61 pages
publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
external identifiers
  • scopus:85166442116
  • pmid:37473453
ISSN
0009-9147
DOI
10.1093/clinchem/hvad080
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fd6dd70d-4d5b-4213-abda-fa3c8b0cc5bf
date added to LUP
2023-10-31 14:13:15
date last changed
2024-07-13 12:32:26
@article{fd6dd70d-4d5b-4213-abda-fa3c8b0cc5bf,
  abstract     = {{<p>BACKGROUND: Numerous laboratory tests are used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus. The quality of the scientific evidence supporting the use of these assays varies substantially. APPROACH: An expert committee compiled evidence-based recommendations for laboratory analysis in screening, diagnosis, or monitoring of diabetes. The overall quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendations were evaluated. The draft consensus recommendations were evaluated by invited reviewers and presented for public comment. Suggestions were incorporated as deemed appropriate by the authors (see Acknowledgments). The guidelines were reviewed by the Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine Committee and the Board of Directors of the American Association of Clinical Chemistry and by the Professional Practice Committee of the American Diabetes Association. CONTENT: Diabetes can be diagnosed by demonstrating increased concentrations of glucose in venous plasma or increased hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c) in the blood. Glycemic control is monitored by the people with diabetes measuring their own blood glucose with meters and/or with continuous interstitial glucose monitoring (CGM) devices and also by laboratory analysis of Hb A1c. The potential roles of noninvasive glucose monitoring, genetic testing, and measurement of ketones, autoantibodies, urine albumin, insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide are addressed. SUMMARY: The guidelines provide specific recommendations based on published data or derived from expert consensus. Several analytes are found to have minimal clinical value at the present time, and measurement of them is not recommended.</p>}},
  author       = {{Sacks, David B. and Arnold, Mark and Bakris, George L. and Bruns, David E. and Horvath, Andrea R. and Lernmark, Åke and Metzger, Boyd E. and Nathan, David M. and Kirkman, M. Sue}},
  issn         = {{0009-9147}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{8}},
  pages        = {{808--868}},
  publisher    = {{American Association for Clinical Chemistry}},
  series       = {{Clinical Chemistry}},
  title        = {{Guidelines and Recommendations for Laboratory Analysis in the Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes Mellitus}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/clinchem/hvad080}},
  doi          = {{10.1093/clinchem/hvad080}},
  volume       = {{69}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}