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Neighborhood linking social capital as a predictor of lung cancer : A Swedish national cohort study

Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2019) In Cancer Epidemiology 61. p.23-29
Abstract

Background: The aim of this nationwide follow-up study was to examine whether neighborhood linking social capital is associated with lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases, after adjustment for individual- and familial-level factors. Methods: This follow-up study comprised 2,123,707 men and 2,046,174 women aged 25 years or older in Sweden. The follow-up period started on January 1, 2002 and proceeded until first incident of lung cancer, mortality of lung cancer, death from any other cause, emigration or the end of the study period on December 31, 2010. Multilevel logistic regression models (individual-level factors at the first level and neighborhood-level factors at the second level)were used to calculate odds ratios... (More)

Background: The aim of this nationwide follow-up study was to examine whether neighborhood linking social capital is associated with lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases, after adjustment for individual- and familial-level factors. Methods: This follow-up study comprised 2,123,707 men and 2,046,174 women aged 25 years or older in Sweden. The follow-up period started on January 1, 2002 and proceeded until first incident of lung cancer, mortality of lung cancer, death from any other cause, emigration or the end of the study period on December 31, 2010. Multilevel logistic regression models (individual-level factors at the first level and neighborhood-level factors at the second level)were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs)with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: We identified 16,561 lung cancer cases (8422 men and 8139 women)during the follow-up period. Higher ORs of lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases, were observed in individuals who lived in neighborhoods with low social capital (men: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.27–1.47; women: OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.23–1.42)than in those living in neighborhoods with high social capital, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: The results of this large national cohort study suggest that neighborhood linking social capital has important independent effects on lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases. These findings indicate that decision-makers must consider the effect of neighborhood-level factors as well as individual- and familial-level factors.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Follow-up study, Lung cancer, Multilevel analysis, Social capital
in
Cancer Epidemiology
volume
61
pages
7 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85065776721
ISSN
1877-7821
DOI
10.1016/j.canep.2019.05.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fdfb4f16-c1f1-4152-9eca-fcb67c898669
date added to LUP
2019-05-28 08:17:21
date last changed
2019-06-19 04:13:46
@article{fdfb4f16-c1f1-4152-9eca-fcb67c898669,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: The aim of this nationwide follow-up study was to examine whether neighborhood linking social capital is associated with lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases, after adjustment for individual- and familial-level factors. Methods: This follow-up study comprised 2,123,707 men and 2,046,174 women aged 25 years or older in Sweden. The follow-up period started on January 1, 2002 and proceeded until first incident of lung cancer, mortality of lung cancer, death from any other cause, emigration or the end of the study period on December 31, 2010. Multilevel logistic regression models (individual-level factors at the first level and neighborhood-level factors at the second level)were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs)with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: We identified 16,561 lung cancer cases (8422 men and 8139 women)during the follow-up period. Higher ORs of lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases, were observed in individuals who lived in neighborhoods with low social capital (men: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.27–1.47; women: OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.23–1.42)than in those living in neighborhoods with high social capital, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: The results of this large national cohort study suggest that neighborhood linking social capital has important independent effects on lung cancer, including incident and mortality cases. These findings indicate that decision-makers must consider the effect of neighborhood-level factors as well as individual- and familial-level factors.</p>},
  author       = {Hamano, Tsuyoshi and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1877-7821},
  keyword      = {Follow-up study,Lung cancer,Multilevel analysis,Social capital},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {23--29},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Cancer Epidemiology},
  title        = {Neighborhood linking social capital as a predictor of lung cancer : A Swedish national cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2019.05.005},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2019},
}