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Insider? Outsider? The Identity of Taiwanese in Shanghai

Wang, Hsiang-Lung (2004)
Centre for East and South-East Asian Studies, Lund University
Abstract
The aim of this thesis is to discuss the construction of Taiwanese identity in Shanghai and compare with the studies on identity formation in Taiwan itself. The thesis is divided into three parts: cultural identity, ethnic identity and political identity. A total of 10 male and female students from Taiwan who had resided a year and above and enrolled in higher education in Shanghai were interviewed. They were asked to explain the reasons for studying in mainland albeit the accreditation policy on academic background acquired in mainland hasn?t been put into practice thus far. They were also asked to express their cognitions in response to cultural, ethnic and political identity. Their responses were interpreted within the context of the... (More)
The aim of this thesis is to discuss the construction of Taiwanese identity in Shanghai and compare with the studies on identity formation in Taiwan itself. The thesis is divided into three parts: cultural identity, ethnic identity and political identity. A total of 10 male and female students from Taiwan who had resided a year and above and enrolled in higher education in Shanghai were interviewed. They were asked to explain the reasons for studying in mainland albeit the accreditation policy on academic background acquired in mainland hasn?t been put into practice thus far. They were also asked to express their cognitions in response to cultural, ethnic and political identity. Their responses were interpreted within the context of the historical formation of Taiwan as well as the summary results of identity-related studies in former days. The results show that Taiwanese and Chinese identities were mutually compatible in cultural domains and help to dispel myths about the Taiwanese identity has been shifted, localized and substituent consonant with different demographic groups, the passage of time and education in mainland whereas their advocacies of different parties in political spectrum are reconstructed to the middle-of-the-road in light of staying in Shanghai. The results also help to illuminate the differences between Taiwanese identity and national identity. Ultimately, more pluralistic, flexible, and pragmatic criterion of Taiwanese identity in response to the peaceful milieu, business climate, and sustainability of offspring are manifested. (Less)
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author
Wang, Hsiang-Lung
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Taiwan, China, Shanghai, sovereignty, identity, cross-Strait relations, Social sciences, Samhällsvetenskaper
language
English
id
1327537
date added to LUP
2006-08-15
date last changed
2006-08-15
@misc{1327537,
  abstract     = {The aim of this thesis is to discuss the construction of Taiwanese identity in Shanghai and compare with the studies on identity formation in Taiwan itself. The thesis is divided into three parts: cultural identity, ethnic identity and political identity. A total of 10 male and female students from Taiwan who had resided a year and above and enrolled in higher education in Shanghai were interviewed. They were asked to explain the reasons for studying in mainland albeit the accreditation policy on academic background acquired in mainland hasn?t been put into practice thus far. They were also asked to express their cognitions in response to cultural, ethnic and political identity. Their responses were interpreted within the context of the historical formation of Taiwan as well as the summary results of identity-related studies in former days. The results show that Taiwanese and Chinese identities were mutually compatible in cultural domains and help to dispel myths about the Taiwanese identity has been shifted, localized and substituent consonant with different demographic groups, the passage of time and education in mainland whereas their advocacies of different parties in political spectrum are reconstructed to the middle-of-the-road in light of staying in Shanghai. The results also help to illuminate the differences between Taiwanese identity and national identity. Ultimately, more pluralistic, flexible, and pragmatic criterion of Taiwanese identity in response to the peaceful milieu, business climate, and sustainability of offspring are manifested.},
  author       = {Wang, Hsiang-Lung},
  keyword      = {Taiwan,China,Shanghai,sovereignty,identity,cross-Strait relations,Social sciences,Samhällsvetenskaper},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Insider? Outsider? The Identity of Taiwanese in Shanghai},
  year         = {2004},
}