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Thermal Energy Storage in Sweden and Denmark: Potentials for Technology Transfer

Harris, Michael LU (2011) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN41 20111
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract (Swedish)
Management of intermittent renewable energy sources (RES) such as wind and solar is a significant issue for countries with interconnected electricity markets. Increasing amounts of electricity from intermittent RES increases the variability of electricity supply, causing electricity prices to become highly sensitive weather conditions. Unpredictable prices have a negative effect on new infrastructure investment both for renewables and for existing combined heat and power (CHP) production. Storage of electricity to alleviate that variability is costly and problematic. Storage of heat, however, is possible, and electricity can be efficiently turned into heat. Where there is a demand for district heating, Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can... (More)
Management of intermittent renewable energy sources (RES) such as wind and solar is a significant issue for countries with interconnected electricity markets. Increasing amounts of electricity from intermittent RES increases the variability of electricity supply, causing electricity prices to become highly sensitive weather conditions. Unpredictable prices have a negative effect on new infrastructure investment both for renewables and for existing combined heat and power (CHP) production. Storage of electricity to alleviate that variability is costly and problematic. Storage of heat, however, is possible, and electricity can be efficiently turned into heat. Where there is a demand for district heating, Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can offer CHP /district heating operators the flexibility to produce heat from fuels, or with stored heat generated from ‘excess’ intermittent electricity. TES systems have evolved in different jurisdictions; if TES systems are to become mainstream, greater use of both existing technologies and applicable ones from other jurisdictions is necessary. Ensuring public understanding and acceptance of new ways of using electricity for heating (via heat pumps) is critical. Sweden and Denmark have developed independent strategies for TES: Aquifer and Borehole TES in Sweden, and Pit TES in Denmark. This paper identifies the path-dependent evolution of the Swedish and Danish energy systems that influenced the TES technologies that each developed. Opportunities for TES technology transfer between these countries and potential roles for government, businesses and regional planners are explored. (Less)
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author
Harris, Michael LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN41 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Thermal Energy Storage Sweden Denmark Renewable Integration
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2011:19
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
2174449
date added to LUP
2011-10-19 11:52:18
date last changed
2011-10-19 11:52:18
@misc{2174449,
  abstract     = {Management of intermittent renewable energy sources (RES) such as wind and solar is a significant issue for countries with interconnected electricity markets. Increasing amounts of electricity from intermittent RES increases the variability of electricity supply, causing electricity prices to become highly sensitive weather conditions. Unpredictable prices have a negative effect on new infrastructure investment both for renewables and for existing combined heat and power (CHP) production.  Storage of electricity to alleviate that variability is costly and problematic. Storage of heat, however, is possible, and electricity can be efficiently turned into heat.  Where there is a demand for district heating, Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can offer CHP /district heating operators the flexibility to produce heat from fuels, or with stored heat generated from ‘excess’ intermittent electricity. TES systems have evolved in different jurisdictions; if TES systems are to become mainstream, greater use of both existing technologies and applicable ones from other jurisdictions is necessary.  Ensuring public understanding and acceptance of new ways of using electricity for heating (via heat pumps) is critical.  Sweden and Denmark have developed independent strategies for TES: Aquifer and Borehole TES in Sweden, and Pit TES in Denmark.  This paper identifies the path-dependent evolution of the Swedish and Danish energy systems that influenced the TES technologies that each developed. Opportunities for TES technology transfer between these countries and potential roles for government, businesses and regional planners are explored.},
  author       = {Harris, Michael},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Thermal Energy Storage Sweden Denmark Renewable Integration},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {Thermal Energy Storage in Sweden and Denmark: Potentials for Technology Transfer},
  year         = {2011},
}