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GM Plants in Green Economies: A Risk of Necessity?

Cregar, Amy LU (2011) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN56 20111
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
What this paper endeavors to achieve is an exploration into the issues behind and within the
debate surrounding the inclusion of GM plants in a green economic framework. What is first
described is the green economic framework, what it is, how it works, why it is desired.
Following this is the subject of plant biotechnology, what it is and how it differs from
conventional plant breeding, its potential, and how it is changing the economic system
through geodistibution and resource maximization. Biorefineries are discussed in some detail
to illustrate the combined bio and physiochemical potentials and processes of technology.
Risk is defined, categorized, and compared. The management of risk is addressed and the
democratization of... (More)
What this paper endeavors to achieve is an exploration into the issues behind and within the
debate surrounding the inclusion of GM plants in a green economic framework. What is first
described is the green economic framework, what it is, how it works, why it is desired.
Following this is the subject of plant biotechnology, what it is and how it differs from
conventional plant breeding, its potential, and how it is changing the economic system
through geodistibution and resource maximization. Biorefineries are discussed in some detail
to illustrate the combined bio and physiochemical potentials and processes of technology.
Risk is defined, categorized, and compared. The management of risk is addressed and the
democratization of risk is explored through citizen participation and informational
transparency. Following this, the paper delves into perception and how it interacts with risk.
Perceptions of biotechnology are managed, for better or worse, by proponents and
opponents alike; this is explored through stakeholder identification, and through comparison
of their motivations. Barriers to the emergence of green economic systems are identified and
the objections put forth, the inclusions of GM plants within them are elucidated. Biofuels, as
a crucial component of green economies are discussed in terms of their economic and
environmental potentials, positive and negative. The paper finishes with rationale on why
perceptions regarding GMOs should be openly and vigorously reconsidered. Placing GM
plants back on the political agenda would call for rational debate and broader engagement
with the issues posed by biotechnology, by industry, scientists, government and the global
populace. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Cregar, Amy LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN56 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Plant biotechnology, green economic framework, bio-based resources, risk and perception, genetic modification, GMO
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2011:03
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
2203241
date added to LUP
2011-11-08 15:00:06
date last changed
2011-11-08 15:00:06
@misc{2203241,
  abstract     = {What this paper endeavors to achieve is an exploration into the issues behind and within the
debate surrounding the inclusion of GM plants in a green economic framework. What is first
described is the green economic framework, what it is, how it works, why it is desired.
Following this is the subject of plant biotechnology, what it is and how it differs from
conventional plant breeding, its potential, and how it is changing the economic system
through geodistibution and resource maximization. Biorefineries are discussed in some detail
to illustrate the combined bio and physiochemical potentials and processes of technology.
Risk is defined, categorized, and compared. The management of risk is addressed and the
democratization of risk is explored through citizen participation and informational
transparency. Following this, the paper delves into perception and how it interacts with risk.
Perceptions of biotechnology are managed, for better or worse, by proponents and
opponents alike; this is explored through stakeholder identification, and through comparison
of their motivations. Barriers to the emergence of green economic systems are identified and
the objections put forth, the inclusions of GM plants within them are elucidated. Biofuels, as
a crucial component of green economies are discussed in terms of their economic and
environmental potentials, positive and negative. The paper finishes with rationale on why
perceptions regarding GMOs should be openly and vigorously reconsidered. Placing GM
plants back on the political agenda would call for rational debate and broader engagement
with the issues posed by biotechnology, by industry, scientists, government and the global
populace.},
  author       = {Cregar, Amy},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Plant biotechnology,green economic framework,bio-based resources,risk and
perception,genetic modification,GMO},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {GM Plants in Green Economies: A Risk of Necessity?},
  year         = {2011},
}