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“This Video is Sponsored by L’Oréal” - A Test of Competing Hypotheses on the Effects of Sponsorship

Lundin, Paulina LU and Huhn, Kristina LU (2017) BUSN39 20171
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Thesis purpose: The aims of this thesis are to investigate (1) the effect of sponsorship disclosure timing (before vs. after) on attitudes towards the brand and attitudes towards the vlogger in a beauty vlog context and (2) test a possible moderating effect of discount codes on the relationships between disclosure timing and attitudes towards the brand and the vlogger. These two aims were pursued by testing competing hypotheses.

Methodology: An experiment was conducted with a 2 (disclosure timing: before vs. after) x 2 (discount: discount vs. no discount) between subjects design.  

Theoretical perspective: The study draws on the literature streams of influencer marketing and sponsorship disclosure. Theories of persuasion knowledge,... (More)
Thesis purpose: The aims of this thesis are to investigate (1) the effect of sponsorship disclosure timing (before vs. after) on attitudes towards the brand and attitudes towards the vlogger in a beauty vlog context and (2) test a possible moderating effect of discount codes on the relationships between disclosure timing and attitudes towards the brand and the vlogger. These two aims were pursued by testing competing hypotheses.

Methodology: An experiment was conducted with a 2 (disclosure timing: before vs. after) x 2 (discount: discount vs. no discount) between subjects design.  

Theoretical perspective: The study draws on the literature streams of influencer marketing and sponsorship disclosure. Theories of persuasion knowledge, exchange theory and equity theory are also applied.

Empirical data: The data was collected through a web-based survey. 410 responses were gathered from social media beauty communities.

Conclusions: In a beauty vlog context, disclosure timing had no effects on attitudes, but – as seen through a preliminary data analysis – rather affected the ability to recall a disclosure statement. Moreover, offering a discount did not moderate the relationships between disclosure timing and brand attitude and attitude towards the vlogger. Furthermore, in contrast to previous studies, sponsorship disclosures only affected attitudes towards the vlogger negatively, while brand attitudes remained unaffected. Although our initial framework was not supported, the findings provided valuable new insights. We therefore conclude with a modified version of our initial theoretical framework, together with an alternative framework for testing the effects of sponsorship disclosures in beauty vlogs. (Less)
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author
Lundin, Paulina LU and Huhn, Kristina LU
supervisor
organization
course
BUSN39 20171
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Beauty vlogs, Brand Attittude, Vlogger Attitude, Sponsorship Disclosure
language
English
id
8916011
date added to LUP
2017-06-22 11:13:05
date last changed
2017-06-22 11:13:05
@misc{8916011,
  abstract     = {Thesis purpose: The aims of this thesis are to investigate (1) the effect of sponsorship disclosure timing (before vs. after) on attitudes towards the brand and attitudes towards the vlogger in a beauty vlog context and (2) test a possible moderating effect of discount codes on the relationships between disclosure timing and attitudes towards the brand and the vlogger. These two aims were pursued by testing competing hypotheses. 

Methodology: An experiment was conducted with a 2 (disclosure timing: before vs. after) x 2 (discount: discount vs. no discount) between subjects design.  

Theoretical perspective: The study draws on the literature streams of influencer marketing and sponsorship disclosure. Theories of persuasion knowledge, exchange theory and equity theory are also applied.

Empirical data: The data was collected through a web-based survey. 410 responses were gathered from social media beauty communities.

Conclusions: In a beauty vlog context, disclosure timing had no effects on attitudes, but – as seen through a preliminary data analysis – rather affected the ability to recall a disclosure statement. Moreover, offering a discount did not moderate the relationships between disclosure timing and brand attitude and attitude towards the vlogger. Furthermore, in contrast to previous studies, sponsorship disclosures only affected attitudes towards the vlogger negatively, while brand attitudes remained unaffected. Although our initial framework was not supported, the findings provided valuable new insights. We therefore conclude with a modified version of our initial theoretical framework, together with an alternative framework for testing the effects of sponsorship disclosures in beauty vlogs.},
  author       = {Lundin, Paulina and Huhn, Kristina},
  keyword      = {Beauty vlogs,Brand Attittude,Vlogger Attitude,Sponsorship Disclosure},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {“This Video is Sponsored by L’Oréal” - A Test of Competing Hypotheses on the Effects of Sponsorship},
  year         = {2017},
}