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Evaluating the behaviour of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v in non-dairy oat based yogurt using two different packaging materials

Mohan, Divya LU (2017) MTTM01 20171
Packaging Logistics
Abstract
There is an upsurge of consumer interest in functional foods, especially probiotics. Alongside there is a global rise in the ‘vegan’ market. However, there is insufficient research and development in the field of non-dairy probiotic food formulations. Development of probiotic oat-based yogurt, called oatgurt that is manufactured by Oatly AB, was studied by incorporating Lactobacillus plantarum 299v strain, which maintains the products’ vegan label. The two important factors that could affect probiotic bacterial strain viability and oatgurt’s physicochemical properties include the step of strain incorporation and presence of oxygen. The probiotic strain was incorporated into two different food matrices; fresh oatgurt (incorporated... (More)
There is an upsurge of consumer interest in functional foods, especially probiotics. Alongside there is a global rise in the ‘vegan’ market. However, there is insufficient research and development in the field of non-dairy probiotic food formulations. Development of probiotic oat-based yogurt, called oatgurt that is manufactured by Oatly AB, was studied by incorporating Lactobacillus plantarum 299v strain, which maintains the products’ vegan label. The two important factors that could affect probiotic bacterial strain viability and oatgurt’s physicochemical properties include the step of strain incorporation and presence of oxygen. The probiotic strain was incorporated into two different food matrices; fresh oatgurt (incorporated before fermentation) and commercial oatgurt (incorporated after fermentation) maintained at 8°C in an incubator for 8 weeks. The effect of oxygen was evaluated by comparing polypropylene (PP) and glass as packaging materials for the two food matrices. In both food matrices, the viability of the strain in PP cups (~1 mm thickness), which has an oxygen transmission rate of 150-200 ml/m2.day.atm, was similar to the viability obtained in glass jars, which is impermeable to oxygen. The presence of probiotic strain in oatgurt resulted in a gradual reduction in pH over time in both packaging materials. Glass had comparatively superior effect on maintaining oatgurt colour stability than PP (p<0.05), which was perceptible only after close observation even at week 8. The overall comparative analysis showed that PP cups could be effectively used as packaging units for probiotic oatgurt. Sensory evaluation and pilot scale experimentation of the resulting probiotic oatgurt remains necessary to confirm commercial product stability. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Vegan probiotic oat based yogurt

We have billions of soldiers in our gut helping us stay healthy. They need to be replaced regularly through food. If you are vegan or cannot digest milk or simply love oats, there is good news for you.
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author
Mohan, Divya LU
supervisor
organization
course
MTTM01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
oatgurt, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, probiotic, polypropylene, glass
ISBN
978-91-7753-363-4
language
English
additional info
The thesis was conducted in collaboration with Oatly AB, Sweden.
id
8916119
date added to LUP
2017-06-16 13:25:29
date last changed
2017-06-16 13:25:29
@misc{8916119,
  abstract     = {There is an upsurge of consumer interest in functional foods, especially probiotics. Alongside there is a global rise in the ‘vegan’ market. However, there is insufficient research and development in the field of non-dairy probiotic food formulations. Development of probiotic oat-based yogurt, called oatgurt that is manufactured by Oatly AB, was studied by incorporating [i]Lactobacillus plantarum[/i] 299v strain, which maintains the products’ vegan label. The two important factors that could affect probiotic bacterial strain viability and oatgurt’s physicochemical properties include the step of strain incorporation and presence of oxygen. The probiotic strain was incorporated into two different food matrices; fresh oatgurt (incorporated before fermentation) and commercial oatgurt (incorporated after fermentation) maintained at 8°C in an incubator for 8 weeks. The effect of oxygen was evaluated by comparing polypropylene (PP) and glass as packaging materials for the two food matrices. In both food matrices, the viability of the strain in PP cups (~1 mm thickness), which has an oxygen transmission rate of 150-200 ml/m2.day.atm, was similar to the viability obtained in glass jars, which is impermeable to oxygen. The presence of probiotic strain in oatgurt resulted in a gradual reduction in pH over time in both packaging materials. Glass had comparatively superior effect on maintaining oatgurt colour stability than PP (p<0.05), which was perceptible only after close observation even at week 8. The overall comparative analysis showed that PP cups could be effectively used as packaging units for probiotic oatgurt. Sensory evaluation and pilot scale experimentation of the resulting probiotic oatgurt remains necessary to confirm commercial product stability.},
  author       = {Mohan, Divya},
  isbn         = {978-91-7753-363-4},
  keyword      = {oatgurt,Lactobacillus plantarum 299v,probiotic,polypropylene,glass},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Evaluating the behaviour of Lactobacillus plantarum  299v in non-dairy oat based yogurt using two different packaging materials},
  year         = {2017},
}