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Do Paid and Unpaid Volunteer Workers Perceive Their Work Experiences in Not-For-Profit Organizations Differently?

Mardiansyah, Didi LU (2018) PSYP01 20181
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Despite the important roles volunteer workers in not-for-profit organization play in improving the quality of individual lives in various aspect, only a handful of research focusing on volunteer workers have been conducted. There are two main purposes for this study. First, to examine how overall volunteer workers in not-for-profit organizations view their working experience by analyzing the strength of a correlation between demographic variables and several work-related variables (i.e. perceived rewards, job satisfaction, work engagement, intention to leave and stress). Second, to examine whether there is a discernable difference between paid and unpaid volunteer workers regarding these work-related variables. Furthermore, this study also... (More)
Despite the important roles volunteer workers in not-for-profit organization play in improving the quality of individual lives in various aspect, only a handful of research focusing on volunteer workers have been conducted. There are two main purposes for this study. First, to examine how overall volunteer workers in not-for-profit organizations view their working experience by analyzing the strength of a correlation between demographic variables and several work-related variables (i.e. perceived rewards, job satisfaction, work engagement, intention to leave and stress). Second, to examine whether there is a discernable difference between paid and unpaid volunteer workers regarding these work-related variables. Furthermore, this study also explores the occurrence of significant differences with the two groups of volunteers. A cross-sectional online questionnaire was used and the sample consisted of 154 individuals working as paid volunteers (N=67) and unpaid volunteers (N=87). The study found that in overall volunteers, age, tenure, and cohabitant status were negatively correlated with self-reported stress. Result of t-tests showed that there were no significant differences in the work-related variables between paid and unpaid volunteer workers. Furthermore, paid and unpaid volunteer workers differed significantly in terms of gender in relation to intention to leave. The result showed that male paid volunteer workers
showed a higher prevalence of intention to leave. Moreover, these two groups also differed significantly in the association of perceived rewards and self-reported stress. The implications of these findings and the practical applicability will be critically discussed. (Less)
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author
Mardiansyah, Didi LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Volunteers, not-for-profit, perceived rewards, job satisfaction, work engagement, intention to leave, stress.
language
English
id
8960001
date added to LUP
2018-10-09 11:44:51
date last changed
2018-10-09 11:44:51
@misc{8960001,
  abstract     = {Despite the important roles volunteer workers in not-for-profit organization play in improving the quality of individual lives in various aspect, only a handful of research focusing on volunteer workers have been conducted. There are two main purposes for this study. First, to examine how overall volunteer workers in not-for-profit organizations view their working experience by analyzing the strength of a correlation between demographic variables and several work-related variables (i.e. perceived rewards, job satisfaction, work engagement, intention to leave and stress). Second, to examine whether there is a discernable difference between paid and unpaid volunteer workers regarding these work-related variables. Furthermore, this study also explores the occurrence of significant differences with the two groups of volunteers. A cross-sectional online questionnaire was used and the sample consisted of 154 individuals working as paid volunteers (N=67) and unpaid volunteers (N=87). The study found that in overall volunteers, age, tenure, and cohabitant status were negatively correlated with self-reported stress. Result of t-tests showed that there were no significant differences in the work-related variables between paid and unpaid volunteer workers. Furthermore, paid and unpaid volunteer workers differed significantly in terms of gender in relation to intention to leave. The result showed that male paid volunteer workers
showed a higher prevalence of intention to leave. Moreover, these two groups also differed significantly in the association of perceived rewards and self-reported stress. The implications of these findings and the practical applicability will be critically discussed.},
  author       = {Mardiansyah, Didi},
  keyword      = {Volunteers,not-for-profit,perceived rewards,job satisfaction,work engagement,intention to leave,stress.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Do Paid and Unpaid Volunteer Workers Perceive Their Work Experiences in Not-For-Profit Organizations Differently?},
  year         = {2018},
}