Advanced

'Schools need to adjust themselves toward the kid, not the kid adjusting themselves to the schools' - A social justice and capability approach exploring inclusion of dyslexic students and quality in primary education in Uganda.

Christensen, Rebecca Friis LU (2019) MIDM19 20191
Department of Human Geography
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
The paper explores inclusion of dyslexic children in Uganda’s primary education system and aims to provide qualitative evidence on barriers and challenges impacting their educational attainments and social inclusion. The paper firstly examines scholarly research on dyslexia and inclusive education and establishes demographic patterns and development trends of inclusive primary education in Uganda. The social justice and capability approach guides the analysis of experiences of relevance, inclusion and democracy dimensions for dyslexic children in Uganda’s primary education. The contribution derives from interviews and groups discussion undertaken with key informants working on inclusive education or dyslexia as well as caretakers of... (More)
The paper explores inclusion of dyslexic children in Uganda’s primary education system and aims to provide qualitative evidence on barriers and challenges impacting their educational attainments and social inclusion. The paper firstly examines scholarly research on dyslexia and inclusive education and establishes demographic patterns and development trends of inclusive primary education in Uganda. The social justice and capability approach guides the analysis of experiences of relevance, inclusion and democracy dimensions for dyslexic children in Uganda’s primary education. The contribution derives from interviews and groups discussion undertaken with key informants working on inclusive education or dyslexia as well as caretakers of dyslexic children in Kampala, Uganda through an exploratory qualitative case study. Findings show a significant relationship between dyslexia and inclusion as well as experiences of quality education in Uganda. Dyslexic students are found to experience exclusion both within schools through structural and institutional barriers within the education system. Dyslexic students are disproportionately affected in educational attainments as negative perceptions and system inabilities to improve their learning hinders them in progression and completion of primary as well as transition to secondary. It is argued that experiences of social exclusion contribute to potential long-term impacts on inclusion of dyslexic children in Uganda. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Christensen, Rebecca Friis LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM19 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
dyslexia, quality education, inclusive education, primary education, Uganda
language
English
id
8991924
date added to LUP
2019-10-17 14:09:42
date last changed
2019-10-17 14:09:42
@misc{8991924,
  abstract     = {The paper explores inclusion of dyslexic children in Uganda’s primary education system and aims to provide qualitative evidence on barriers and challenges impacting their educational attainments and social inclusion. The paper firstly examines scholarly research on dyslexia and inclusive education and establishes demographic patterns and development trends of inclusive primary education in Uganda. The social justice and capability approach guides the analysis of experiences of relevance, inclusion and democracy dimensions for dyslexic children in Uganda’s primary education. The contribution derives from interviews and groups discussion undertaken with key informants working on inclusive education or dyslexia as well as caretakers of dyslexic children in Kampala, Uganda through an exploratory qualitative case study. Findings show a significant relationship between dyslexia and inclusion as well as experiences of quality education in Uganda. Dyslexic students are found to experience exclusion both within schools through structural and institutional barriers within the education system. Dyslexic students are disproportionately affected in educational attainments as negative perceptions and system inabilities to improve their learning hinders them in progression and completion of primary as well as transition to secondary. It is argued that experiences of social exclusion contribute to potential long-term impacts on inclusion of dyslexic children in Uganda.},
  author       = {Christensen, Rebecca Friis},
  keyword      = {dyslexia,quality education,inclusive education,primary education,Uganda},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {'Schools need to adjust themselves toward the kid, not the kid adjusting themselves to the schools' - A social justice and capability approach exploring inclusion of dyslexic students and quality in primary education in Uganda.},
  year         = {2019},
}