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What's in a schema? Bodily mimesis and the grounding of language

Zlatev, Jordan LU (2005) In From Perception To Meaning: Image Schemas In Cognitive Linguistics p.313-342
Abstract
The chapter defines mimetic schemas as dynamic, concrete and preverbal representations, involving the body image, which are accessible to consciousness, and pre-reflectively shared in a community. Mimetic schemas derive from a uniquely human capacity for bodily mimesis (Donald 1991; Zlatev, Persson and Gardenfors 2005) and are argued to play a key role in language acquisition, language evolution and the linking of phenomenal experience and shared meaning. In this sense they are suggested to provide a "grounding" of language which is more adequate than that of image schemas. By comparing the two concepts along six different dimensions: representation, accessibility to consciousness, level of abstractness, dynamicity, sensory modality and... (More)
The chapter defines mimetic schemas as dynamic, concrete and preverbal representations, involving the body image, which are accessible to consciousness, and pre-reflectively shared in a community. Mimetic schemas derive from a uniquely human capacity for bodily mimesis (Donald 1991; Zlatev, Persson and Gardenfors 2005) and are argued to play a key role in language acquisition, language evolution and the linking of phenomenal experience and shared meaning. In this sense they are suggested to provide a "grounding" of language which is more adequate than that of image schemas. By comparing the two concepts along six different dimensions: representation, accessibility to consciousness, level of abstractness, dynamicity, sensory modality and (inter) subjectivity the term "image schema" is shown to be highly polysemous, which is problematic for a concept that purports to be foundational within Cognitive Linguistics. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bodily mimesis, consciousness, "grounding", intersubjectivity, mimetic schemas, representation, language acquisition
in
From Perception To Meaning: Image Schemas In Cognitive Linguistics
pages
313 - 342
publisher
De Gruyter
external identifiers
  • WOS:000277943100013
ISBN
978-3-11-019753-2
DOI
10.1515/9783110197532
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7e3382bd-c9bf-4a95-9be0-cf6e8263f208 (old id 2199817)
date added to LUP
2011-11-10 09:40:12
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:45:40
@misc{7e3382bd-c9bf-4a95-9be0-cf6e8263f208,
  abstract     = {The chapter defines mimetic schemas as dynamic, concrete and preverbal representations, involving the body image, which are accessible to consciousness, and pre-reflectively shared in a community. Mimetic schemas derive from a uniquely human capacity for bodily mimesis (Donald 1991; Zlatev, Persson and Gardenfors 2005) and are argued to play a key role in language acquisition, language evolution and the linking of phenomenal experience and shared meaning. In this sense they are suggested to provide a "grounding" of language which is more adequate than that of image schemas. By comparing the two concepts along six different dimensions: representation, accessibility to consciousness, level of abstractness, dynamicity, sensory modality and (inter) subjectivity the term "image schema" is shown to be highly polysemous, which is problematic for a concept that purports to be foundational within Cognitive Linguistics.},
  author       = {Zlatev, Jordan},
  isbn         = {978-3-11-019753-2},
  keyword      = {bodily mimesis,consciousness,"grounding",intersubjectivity,mimetic schemas,representation,language acquisition},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {313--342},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x93b1118)},
  series       = {From Perception To Meaning: Image Schemas In Cognitive Linguistics},
  title        = {What's in a schema? Bodily mimesis and the grounding of language},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/9783110197532},
  year         = {2005},
}