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On the physiological location of otoacoustic emissions

Brännström, Jonas LU and Lantz, Johannes (2001) In Working Papers, Lund University, Dept. of Linguistics 49.
Abstract
During recent years, much attention has been paid otoacoustic emissions in the clinical audiological practice. The received view locates their origin in the cochlea, more precisely in the outer hair cells. It is, however, still uncertain if there is an interaction between the ears regarding otoacoustic emissions. Earlier findings suggest an interaction at the level of the olivocochlear bundle. The aim of this pilot study was to find out if there is any interaction between the two cochleae in the case of otoacoustic emissions. Five subjects with normal hearing participated. Recordings were made of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions during the presentation of contralateral stimuli at three different frequencies (500, 1000 and 2000 Hz). In... (More)
During recent years, much attention has been paid otoacoustic emissions in the clinical audiological practice. The received view locates their origin in the cochlea, more precisely in the outer hair cells. It is, however, still uncertain if there is an interaction between the ears regarding otoacoustic emissions. Earlier findings suggest an interaction at the level of the olivocochlear bundle. The aim of this pilot study was to find out if there is any interaction between the two cochleae in the case of otoacoustic emissions. Five subjects with normal hearing participated. Recordings were made of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions during the presentation of contralateral stimuli at three different frequencies (500, 1000 and 2000 Hz). In general, contralateral stimulation did not provoke otoacoustic emissions. It was concluded that otoacoustic emissions could be part of the fine-tuning mechanism in the cochlea. The frequency resolution, e.g. for speech, depends on very fast modulation of the incoming signal. Due to the neural distance, this modulation would lag behind, if otoacoustic emissions in one ear would effect the opposite one. (Less)
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Working Papers, Lund University, Dept. of Linguistics
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49
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001e5bab-f198-442e-b6a8-fe6764bfabc5 (old id 528993)
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http://www.ling.lu.se/disseminations/pdf/49/bidrag05.pdf
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2007-09-27 09:22:34
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@misc{001e5bab-f198-442e-b6a8-fe6764bfabc5,
  abstract     = {During recent years, much attention has been paid otoacoustic emissions in the clinical audiological practice. The received view locates their origin in the cochlea, more precisely in the outer hair cells. It is, however, still uncertain if there is an interaction between the ears regarding otoacoustic emissions. Earlier findings suggest an interaction at the level of the olivocochlear bundle. The aim of this pilot study was to find out if there is any interaction between the two cochleae in the case of otoacoustic emissions. Five subjects with normal hearing participated. Recordings were made of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions during the presentation of contralateral stimuli at three different frequencies (500, 1000 and 2000 Hz). In general, contralateral stimulation did not provoke otoacoustic emissions. It was concluded that otoacoustic emissions could be part of the fine-tuning mechanism in the cochlea. The frequency resolution, e.g. for speech, depends on very fast modulation of the incoming signal. Due to the neural distance, this modulation would lag behind, if otoacoustic emissions in one ear would effect the opposite one.},
  author       = {Brännström, Jonas and Lantz, Johannes},
  language     = {eng},
  series       = {Working Papers, Lund University, Dept. of Linguistics},
  title        = {On the physiological location of otoacoustic emissions},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2001},
}