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Characterization of Apples and Apple Cider Producedby a Guelph Area Orchard

Piyasena, P; Rayner, Marilyn LU ; Bartlett, F; Lu, X and McKellar, R (2002) In Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft und-Technologie 35(4). p.367-372
Abstract
Thermal stability of food-borne pathogens in apple cider is influenced by the composition of the product. As a preliminary step to

determine the effect of pasteurization of apple cider on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a study was carried out to

characterize apples and unpasteurized apple cider produced by a Guelph area orchard. Samples of commercial unpasteurized cider

and the constituent apples were collected over 13 wk from August to November 1998, and unpasteurized laboratory cider was made

from the individual apple varieties. pH, titratable acidity, turbidity, total microbial counts, total solids and 1Brix for filtered and

unfiltered samples were measured. The maximum, minimum,... (More)
Thermal stability of food-borne pathogens in apple cider is influenced by the composition of the product. As a preliminary step to

determine the effect of pasteurization of apple cider on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a study was carried out to

characterize apples and unpasteurized apple cider produced by a Guelph area orchard. Samples of commercial unpasteurized cider

and the constituent apples were collected over 13 wk from August to November 1998, and unpasteurized laboratory cider was made

from the individual apple varieties. pH, titratable acidity, turbidity, total microbial counts, total solids and 1Brix for filtered and

unfiltered samples were measured. The maximum, minimum, and average values for all unpasteurized commercial cider samples were

found as follows: pH, 3.71, 3.17, and 3.43; titratable acidity, 93.47, 49.46, and 69.95mL of 0.1N NaOH/100 mL; total solids, 13.21,

10.93, and 11.90%; 1Brix, 13.01, 11.17, and 12.02; turbidity, 238.1, 145.1, and 204.9 nephelometric turbidity units; and total plate

count, 4.91, 2.61, 3.75 log cfu/mL. There were no significant differences (P40.05) between filtered and unfiltered samples. In

addition, in commercial unpasteurized cider, there were no significant differences (P40.05) with respect to any of the factors with

the time of processing. The composition of the unpasteurized laboratory cider made from individual apple varieties was dependent on

the variety, but was generally within the ranges from the published literature values. McIntosh apples showed a significant (P>0.05)

decrease in titratable acidity with time of harvest. The results suggest that it is necessary to take the composition of commercial apple

cider into account when developing thermal inactivation models for food-borne pathogens. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
1Brix, turbidity, total solids, titratable acidity, pH, microbial population, cider, Apple
in
Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft und-Technologie
volume
35
issue
4
pages
367 - 372
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0036379937
DOI
10.1006/fstl.2001.0869
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c64f68b-b097-4445-80df-f2b6f492ea2d (old id 540369)
date added to LUP
2007-11-09 07:48:13
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:40:54
@misc{2c64f68b-b097-4445-80df-f2b6f492ea2d,
  abstract     = {Thermal stability of food-borne pathogens in apple cider is influenced by the composition of the product. As a preliminary step to<br/><br>
determine the effect of pasteurization of apple cider on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a study was carried out to<br/><br>
characterize apples and unpasteurized apple cider produced by a Guelph area orchard. Samples of commercial unpasteurized cider<br/><br>
and the constituent apples were collected over 13 wk from August to November 1998, and unpasteurized laboratory cider was made<br/><br>
from the individual apple varieties. pH, titratable acidity, turbidity, total microbial counts, total solids and 1Brix for filtered and<br/><br>
unfiltered samples were measured. The maximum, minimum, and average values for all unpasteurized commercial cider samples were<br/><br>
found as follows: pH, 3.71, 3.17, and 3.43; titratable acidity, 93.47, 49.46, and 69.95mL of 0.1N NaOH/100 mL; total solids, 13.21,<br/><br>
10.93, and 11.90%; 1Brix, 13.01, 11.17, and 12.02; turbidity, 238.1, 145.1, and 204.9 nephelometric turbidity units; and total plate<br/><br>
count, 4.91, 2.61, 3.75 log cfu/mL. There were no significant differences (P40.05) between filtered and unfiltered samples. In<br/><br>
addition, in commercial unpasteurized cider, there were no significant differences (P40.05) with respect to any of the factors with<br/><br>
the time of processing. The composition of the unpasteurized laboratory cider made from individual apple varieties was dependent on<br/><br>
the variety, but was generally within the ranges from the published literature values. McIntosh apples showed a significant (P&gt;0.05)<br/><br>
decrease in titratable acidity with time of harvest. The results suggest that it is necessary to take the composition of commercial apple<br/><br>
cider into account when developing thermal inactivation models for food-borne pathogens.},
  author       = {Piyasena, P and Rayner, Marilyn and Bartlett, F and Lu, X and McKellar, R},
  keyword      = {1Brix,turbidity,total solids,titratable acidity,pH,microbial population,cider,Apple},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {367--372},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb8ee4c8)},
  series       = {Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft und-Technologie},
  title        = {Characterization of Apples and Apple Cider Producedby a Guelph Area Orchard},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/fstl.2001.0869},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2002},
}