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Transfer and adsorption of surfactants to an expanding oil water interface during membrane emulsification

Rayner, Marilyn LU and Trägårgh, G (2003) In SIK Proceedings 162. p.68-71
Abstract
uses a microporous membrane operated in cross-flow. The continuous phase is pumped along the membrane and sweeps

away dispersed phase droplets forming from pore openings as shown in Figure 1. The key feature of the membrane

emulsification process, which sets it apart from conventional emulsification technologies, is that the size distribution of the

resulting droplets is primarily governed by the choice of membrane and not by the development of turbulent drop break up

[1]. The main advantages of membrane emulsification are the possibility to produce droplets of a defined size with a narrow

size distribution, low shear stress, the potential for lower energy

consumption, and simplicity of... (More)
uses a microporous membrane operated in cross-flow. The continuous phase is pumped along the membrane and sweeps

away dispersed phase droplets forming from pore openings as shown in Figure 1. The key feature of the membrane

emulsification process, which sets it apart from conventional emulsification technologies, is that the size distribution of the

resulting droplets is primarily governed by the choice of membrane and not by the development of turbulent drop break up

[1]. The main advantages of membrane emulsification are the possibility to produce droplets of a defined size with a narrow

size distribution, low shear stress, the potential for lower energy

consumption, and simplicity of design [2].

The interfacial tension and applied dispersed phase pressure

determine the flow rate through the microporous membrane. As a

droplet is pressed into the continuous phase, a new interface is

created and surfactant molecules act at this surface to reduce the

tension over time. Membrane emulsification differs from

conventional emulsification processes in that the droplet

formation time is of the same order of magnitude as the dynamic

interfacial tension of common food emulsifiers [3]. The effect of

emulsifiers is further complicated by the fact that droplet

deformation and adsorption at the interface are coupled, thus

both the rate at which deformation and detachment forces act, as

well as how fast surfactants adsorb to the growing interfacial

area become relevant over the time scales involved.

The objectives of this work were to describe the diffusion controlled adsorption of surfactants at the oil water interface, and

secondly to model the flow of the dispersed phase through a pore and subsequent surface expansion rate as the drop grows

into the continuous phase. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
SIK Proceedings
volume
162
pages
68 - 71
publisher
SIK - Svenska Livsmedelsinstitutet
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cfa58244-c56f-4907-a182-9a0a61276e84 (old id 540401)
date added to LUP
2007-09-24 16:48:56
date last changed
2016-04-16 09:38:34
@misc{cfa58244-c56f-4907-a182-9a0a61276e84,
  abstract     = {uses a microporous membrane operated in cross-flow. The continuous phase is pumped along the membrane and sweeps<br/><br>
away dispersed phase droplets forming from pore openings as shown in Figure 1. The key feature of the membrane<br/><br>
emulsification process, which sets it apart from conventional emulsification technologies, is that the size distribution of the<br/><br>
resulting droplets is primarily governed by the choice of membrane and not by the development of turbulent drop break up<br/><br>
[1]. The main advantages of membrane emulsification are the possibility to produce droplets of a defined size with a narrow<br/><br>
size distribution, low shear stress, the potential for lower energy<br/><br>
consumption, and simplicity of design [2].<br/><br>
The interfacial tension and applied dispersed phase pressure<br/><br>
determine the flow rate through the microporous membrane. As a<br/><br>
droplet is pressed into the continuous phase, a new interface is<br/><br>
created and surfactant molecules act at this surface to reduce the<br/><br>
tension over time. Membrane emulsification differs from<br/><br>
conventional emulsification processes in that the droplet<br/><br>
formation time is of the same order of magnitude as the dynamic<br/><br>
interfacial tension of common food emulsifiers [3]. The effect of<br/><br>
emulsifiers is further complicated by the fact that droplet<br/><br>
deformation and adsorption at the interface are coupled, thus<br/><br>
both the rate at which deformation and detachment forces act, as<br/><br>
well as how fast surfactants adsorb to the growing interfacial<br/><br>
area become relevant over the time scales involved.<br/><br>
The objectives of this work were to describe the diffusion controlled adsorption of surfactants at the oil water interface, and<br/><br>
secondly to model the flow of the dispersed phase through a pore and subsequent surface expansion rate as the drop grows<br/><br>
into the continuous phase.},
  author       = {Rayner, Marilyn and Trägårgh, G},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {68--71},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa6f9c40)},
  series       = {SIK Proceedings},
  title        = {Transfer and adsorption of surfactants to an expanding oil water interface during membrane emulsification},
  volume       = {162},
  year         = {2003},
}