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Testing the role of glucose in self-control : A meta-analysis

Dang, Junhua LU (2016) In Appetite 107. p.222-230
Abstract

The glucose view of self-control posited glucose as the physiological substrate of self-control “resource”, which results in three direct corollaries: 1) engaging in a specific self-control activity would result in reduced glucose level; 2) the remaining glucose level after initial exertion of self-control would be positively correlated with following self-control performance; 3) restoring glucose by ingestion would help to improve the impaired self-control performance. The current research conducted a meta-analysis to test how well each of the three corollaries of the glucose view would be empirically supported. We also tested the restoring effect of glucose rinsing on subsequent self-control performance after initial exertion. The... (More)

The glucose view of self-control posited glucose as the physiological substrate of self-control “resource”, which results in three direct corollaries: 1) engaging in a specific self-control activity would result in reduced glucose level; 2) the remaining glucose level after initial exertion of self-control would be positively correlated with following self-control performance; 3) restoring glucose by ingestion would help to improve the impaired self-control performance. The current research conducted a meta-analysis to test how well each of the three corollaries of the glucose view would be empirically supported. We also tested the restoring effect of glucose rinsing on subsequent self-control performance after initial exertion. The results provided clear and consistent evidence against the glucose view of self-control such that none of the three corollaries was supported. In contrast, the effect of glucose rinsing turned out to be significant, but with alarming signs of publication bias. The implications and future directions are discussed.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Ego depletion, Glucose, Meta-analysis, Self-control
in
Appetite
volume
107
pages
9 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84982094990
ISSN
0195-6663
DOI
10.1016/j.appet.2016.07.021
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
732e4425-857c-4803-8186-e1161e08104a
date added to LUP
2016-10-12 09:54:24
date last changed
2016-10-19 16:13:10
@misc{732e4425-857c-4803-8186-e1161e08104a,
  abstract     = {<p>The glucose view of self-control posited glucose as the physiological substrate of self-control “resource”, which results in three direct corollaries: 1) engaging in a specific self-control activity would result in reduced glucose level; 2) the remaining glucose level after initial exertion of self-control would be positively correlated with following self-control performance; 3) restoring glucose by ingestion would help to improve the impaired self-control performance. The current research conducted a meta-analysis to test how well each of the three corollaries of the glucose view would be empirically supported. We also tested the restoring effect of glucose rinsing on subsequent self-control performance after initial exertion. The results provided clear and consistent evidence against the glucose view of self-control such that none of the three corollaries was supported. In contrast, the effect of glucose rinsing turned out to be significant, but with alarming signs of publication bias. The implications and future directions are discussed.</p>},
  author       = {Dang, Junhua},
  issn         = {0195-6663},
  keyword      = {Ego depletion,Glucose,Meta-analysis,Self-control},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  pages        = {222--230},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x831ed30)},
  series       = {Appetite},
  title        = {Testing the role of glucose in self-control : A meta-analysis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.07.021},
  volume       = {107},
  year         = {2016},
}