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The effect of voice quality and competing speakers in a passage comprehension task : perceived effort in relation to cognitive functioning and performance in children with normal hearing

von Lochow, Heike LU ; Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka LU ; Sahlén, Birgitta LU ; Kastberg, Tobias LU and Brännström, K Jonas LU (2017) In Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology p.1-10
Abstract

The study investigates the effect of voice quality and competing speakers on perceived effort in a passage comprehension task in relation to cognitive functioning. In addition, it explores if perceived effort was related to performance. A total of 49 children (aged 7:03 to 12:02 years) with normal hearing participated. The children performed an auditory passage comprehension task presented with six different listening conditions consisting of a typical voice or a dysphonic voice presented in quiet, with one competing speaker, and with four competing speakers. After completing the task, they rated their perceived effort on a five-grade scale. The children also performed tasks measuring working memory capacity (WMC) and executive... (More)

The study investigates the effect of voice quality and competing speakers on perceived effort in a passage comprehension task in relation to cognitive functioning. In addition, it explores if perceived effort was related to performance. A total of 49 children (aged 7:03 to 12:02 years) with normal hearing participated. The children performed an auditory passage comprehension task presented with six different listening conditions consisting of a typical voice or a dysphonic voice presented in quiet, with one competing speaker, and with four competing speakers. After completing the task, they rated their perceived effort on a five-grade scale. The children also performed tasks measuring working memory capacity (WMC) and executive functioning. The results show that voice quality had no direct effect on perceived effort but the children’s ratings of perceived effort were related to their executive functioning. A significant effect was seen for background listening condition indicating higher perceived effort for background listening conditions with competing speakers. The effects of background listening condition were mainly related to the children’s WMC but also their executive functioning. It can be concluded that the individual susceptibility to the effect of the dysphonic voice is related to the child’s executive functioning. The individual susceptibility to the presence of competing speakers is related to the child’s WMC and executive functioning.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Children, dysphonic voice, executive function, multitalker babble noise, voice quality, working memory
in
Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
pages
10 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85016957230
ISSN
1401-5439
DOI
10.1080/14015439.2017.1307446
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0950298c-578c-4b12-bd65-55678cbb5c2e
date added to LUP
2017-05-02 10:04:19
date last changed
2017-05-03 03:00:02
@article{0950298c-578c-4b12-bd65-55678cbb5c2e,
  abstract     = {<p>The study investigates the effect of voice quality and competing speakers on perceived effort in a passage comprehension task in relation to cognitive functioning. In addition, it explores if perceived effort was related to performance. A total of 49 children (aged 7:03 to 12:02 years) with normal hearing participated. The children performed an auditory passage comprehension task presented with six different listening conditions consisting of a typical voice or a dysphonic voice presented in quiet, with one competing speaker, and with four competing speakers. After completing the task, they rated their perceived effort on a five-grade scale. The children also performed tasks measuring working memory capacity (WMC) and executive functioning. The results show that voice quality had no direct effect on perceived effort but the children’s ratings of perceived effort were related to their executive functioning. A significant effect was seen for background listening condition indicating higher perceived effort for background listening conditions with competing speakers. The effects of background listening condition were mainly related to the children’s WMC but also their executive functioning. It can be concluded that the individual susceptibility to the effect of the dysphonic voice is related to the child’s executive functioning. The individual susceptibility to the presence of competing speakers is related to the child’s WMC and executive functioning.</p>},
  author       = {von Lochow, Heike and Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka and Sahlén, Birgitta and Kastberg, Tobias and Brännström, K Jonas},
  issn         = {1401-5439},
  keyword      = {Children,dysphonic voice,executive function,multitalker babble noise,voice quality,working memory},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  pages        = {1--10},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology},
  title        = {The effect of voice quality and competing speakers in a passage comprehension task : perceived effort in relation to cognitive functioning and performance in children with normal hearing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14015439.2017.1307446},
  year         = {2017},
}