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Eye movements during the recollection of text information reflect content rather than the text itself

Traub, Franziska; Johansson, Roger LU and Holmqvist, Kenneth LU (2015) European Conference on Eye Movements, ECEM, 2015 p.67-67
Abstract
Several studies have reported that spontaneous eye movements occur when visuospatial information is recalled from memory. Such gazes closely reflect the content and spatial relations from the original scene layout (e.g., Johansson et al., 2012). However, when someone has originally read a scene description, the memory of the physical layout of the text itself might compete with the memory of the spatial arrangement of the described scene. The present study was designed to address this fundamental issue by having participants read
scene descriptions that where manipulated to be either congruent or incongruent with the spatial layout of the text itself. 28 participants read and recalled three texts: (1) a scene description congruent with... (More)
Several studies have reported that spontaneous eye movements occur when visuospatial information is recalled from memory. Such gazes closely reflect the content and spatial relations from the original scene layout (e.g., Johansson et al., 2012). However, when someone has originally read a scene description, the memory of the physical layout of the text itself might compete with the memory of the spatial arrangement of the described scene. The present study was designed to address this fundamental issue by having participants read
scene descriptions that where manipulated to be either congruent or incongruent with the spatial layout of the text itself. 28 participants read and recalled three texts: (1) a scene description congruent with the spatial layout of the text; (2) a scene description incongruent with the spatial layout of the text; and (3) a control text without any spatial scene content. Recollection was performed orally while gazing at a blank screen. Results demonstrate that participant’s gaze patterns during recall more closely reflect the spatial layout of the scene than the physical locations of the text. Memory data provide evidence that mental models representing either the situation or the text do not necessarily compete but rather supplement each other (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
eye movements, memory retrieval, situation models, mental models, reading, spatial cognition
pages
67 - 67
conference name
European Conference on Eye Movements, ECEM, 2015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0e4f10ee-fdbe-4785-8233-88def2355db8
alternative location
http://ecem2015.univie.ac.at/fileadmin/user_upload/k_ecem2015/proceedings/ECEM2015_Abstracts_150821.pdf
date added to LUP
2016-08-17 11:46:36
date last changed
2017-02-01 14:24:37
@misc{0e4f10ee-fdbe-4785-8233-88def2355db8,
  abstract     = {Several studies have reported that spontaneous eye movements occur when visuospatial information is recalled from memory. Such gazes closely reflect the content and spatial relations from the original scene layout (e.g., Johansson et al., 2012). However, when someone has originally read a scene description, the memory of the physical layout of the text itself might compete with the memory of the spatial arrangement of the described scene. The present study was designed to address this fundamental issue by having participants read<br/>scene descriptions that where manipulated to be either congruent or incongruent with the spatial layout of the text itself. 28 participants read and recalled three texts: (1) a scene description congruent with the spatial layout of the text; (2) a scene description incongruent with the spatial layout of the text; and (3) a control text without any spatial scene content. Recollection was performed orally while gazing at a blank screen. Results demonstrate that participant’s gaze patterns during recall more closely reflect the spatial layout of the scene than the physical locations of the text. Memory data provide evidence that mental models representing either the situation or the text do not necessarily compete but rather supplement each other},
  author       = {Traub, Franziska and Johansson, Roger and Holmqvist, Kenneth},
  keyword      = {eye movements,memory retrieval,situation models,mental models,reading,spatial cognition},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {67--67},
  title        = {Eye movements during the recollection of text information reflect content rather than the text itself},
  year         = {2015},
}