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Subretinal Transplantation of Brain-derived Precursor Cells to Young RCS Rats Promotes Photoreceptor Cell Survival( small star, filled).

Blixt Wojciechowski, Anita LU ; Englund Johansson, Ulrica LU ; Lundberg, Cecilia LU ; Wictorin, Klas LU and Warfvinge, Karin LU (2002) In Experimental Eye Research 75(1). p.23-37
Abstract
The potential use of in vitro-expanded precursor cells or cell lines in brain repair includes transplantation of such cells for cell replacement purposes and the activation of host cells to provide 'self-repair'. Recently, it has been reported that the immortalized brain-derived cell line RN33B (derived from the embryonic rat medullary raphe) survive, integrate and differentiate after subretinal grafting to normal adult rats. Here, it is demonstrated that grafts of these cells survive for at least 6 weeks after implantation into postnatal days 21 and 35 retinas of normal and Royal College of Surgeons rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Implanted cells integrate into the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner retinal layers, and the... (More)
The potential use of in vitro-expanded precursor cells or cell lines in brain repair includes transplantation of such cells for cell replacement purposes and the activation of host cells to provide 'self-repair'. Recently, it has been reported that the immortalized brain-derived cell line RN33B (derived from the embryonic rat medullary raphe) survive, integrate and differentiate after subretinal grafting to normal adult rats. Here, it is demonstrated that grafts of these cells survive for at least 6 weeks after implantation into postnatal days 21 and 35 retinas of normal and Royal College of Surgeons rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Implanted cells integrate into the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner retinal layers, and the anterior part of the optic nerve of both normal and Royal College of Surgeons rats. The RN33B cells migrate within the retina, occupying the whole retina from one eccentricity to the other. A significant number of the grafted cells differentiate into glial cells, as shown by the double labelling of the reporter genes LacZ or green fluorescent protein, with several glial markers, including oligodendrocytic markers. Many implanted cells in the host retina were in a proliferative stage judging from proliferative cell nuclear antigen and SV40 large T-antigen immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, there was a promotion of photoreceptor survival, extending over more than 2/3 of the superior hemisphere, in Royal College of Surgeons rats transplanted at postnatal day 21, but not at postnatal day 35. In addition, grafted cells were found in the surviving photoreceptor layer in these rats. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Experimental Eye Research
volume
75
issue
1
pages
23 - 37
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:12123634
  • wos:000178410000003
  • scopus:0035996269
ISSN
0014-4835
DOI
10.1006/exer.2001.1172
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f72c471f-53d2-4967-90e9-899f71f5c92a (old id 109414)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12123634&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 08:41:06
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:42:03
@article{f72c471f-53d2-4967-90e9-899f71f5c92a,
  abstract     = {The potential use of in vitro-expanded precursor cells or cell lines in brain repair includes transplantation of such cells for cell replacement purposes and the activation of host cells to provide 'self-repair'. Recently, it has been reported that the immortalized brain-derived cell line RN33B (derived from the embryonic rat medullary raphe) survive, integrate and differentiate after subretinal grafting to normal adult rats. Here, it is demonstrated that grafts of these cells survive for at least 6 weeks after implantation into postnatal days 21 and 35 retinas of normal and Royal College of Surgeons rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Implanted cells integrate into the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner retinal layers, and the anterior part of the optic nerve of both normal and Royal College of Surgeons rats. The RN33B cells migrate within the retina, occupying the whole retina from one eccentricity to the other. A significant number of the grafted cells differentiate into glial cells, as shown by the double labelling of the reporter genes LacZ or green fluorescent protein, with several glial markers, including oligodendrocytic markers. Many implanted cells in the host retina were in a proliferative stage judging from proliferative cell nuclear antigen and SV40 large T-antigen immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, there was a promotion of photoreceptor survival, extending over more than 2/3 of the superior hemisphere, in Royal College of Surgeons rats transplanted at postnatal day 21, but not at postnatal day 35. In addition, grafted cells were found in the surviving photoreceptor layer in these rats.},
  author       = {Blixt Wojciechowski, Anita and Englund Johansson, Ulrica and Lundberg, Cecilia and Wictorin, Klas and Warfvinge, Karin},
  issn         = {0014-4835},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {23--37},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Experimental Eye Research},
  title        = {Subretinal Transplantation of Brain-derived Precursor Cells to Young RCS Rats Promotes Photoreceptor Cell Survival( small star, filled).},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/exer.2001.1172},
  volume       = {75},
  year         = {2002},
}