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Neuronal apoptosis after brief and prolonged seizures.

Bengzon, Johan LU ; Mohapel, Paul LU ; Ekdahl Clementson, Christine LU and Lindvall, Olle LU (2002) In Progress in Brain Research 135. p.111-119
Abstract
Evidence has accumulated that apoptotic cell death contributes to brain damage following experimental seizures. A substantial number of degenerating neurons within limbic regions display morphological features of apoptosis following prolonged seizures evoked by systemic or local injections of kainic acid, systemic injections of pilocarpine and sustained stimulation of the perforant path. Although longer periods of seizures consistently result in brain damage, it has previously not been clear whether brief single or intermittent seizures lead to cell death. However, recent results indicate that also single seizures lead to apoptotic neuronal death. A brief, non-convulsive seizure evoked by kindling stimulation was found to produce apoptotic... (More)
Evidence has accumulated that apoptotic cell death contributes to brain damage following experimental seizures. A substantial number of degenerating neurons within limbic regions display morphological features of apoptosis following prolonged seizures evoked by systemic or local injections of kainic acid, systemic injections of pilocarpine and sustained stimulation of the perforant path. Although longer periods of seizures consistently result in brain damage, it has previously not been clear whether brief single or intermittent seizures lead to cell death. However, recent results indicate that also single seizures lead to apoptotic neuronal death. A brief, non-convulsive seizure evoked by kindling stimulation was found to produce apoptotic neurons bilaterally in the rat dentate gyrus. The mechanism triggering and mediating apoptotic degeneration is at present being studied. Alterations in the expression and activity of cell-death regulatory proteins such as members of the Bcl-2 family and the cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase (caspase) family occur in regions vulnerable to cell degeneration, suggesting an involvement of these factors in mediating apoptosis following seizures. Findings of decreased apoptotic cell death following administration of caspase inhibitors prior to and following experimentally induced status epilepticus, further suggest a role for caspases in seizure-evoked neuronal degeneration. Intermediate forms of cell death with both necrotic and apoptotic features have been found after seizures and investigation into the detailed mechanisms of the different forms of cell degeneration is needed before attempts to specific prevention can be made. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Chronic : pathology, Dentate Gyrus : pathology, Animal, Disease Models, Kainic Acid, Neurons : pathology, Pilocarpine, Rats, Seizures : chemically induced, Seizures : pathology, Seizures : physiopathology, Brain Damage, Chronic : etiology, Apoptosis
in
Progress in Brain Research
volume
135
pages
111 - 119
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:12143333
  • wos:000180831700009
  • scopus:0036454650
ISSN
1875-7855
DOI
10.1016/S0079-6123(02)35011-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f7f267db-1f40-4f04-910a-b637ca86cf22 (old id 109637)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12143333&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-06 11:50:55
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:39:40
@article{f7f267db-1f40-4f04-910a-b637ca86cf22,
  abstract     = {Evidence has accumulated that apoptotic cell death contributes to brain damage following experimental seizures. A substantial number of degenerating neurons within limbic regions display morphological features of apoptosis following prolonged seizures evoked by systemic or local injections of kainic acid, systemic injections of pilocarpine and sustained stimulation of the perforant path. Although longer periods of seizures consistently result in brain damage, it has previously not been clear whether brief single or intermittent seizures lead to cell death. However, recent results indicate that also single seizures lead to apoptotic neuronal death. A brief, non-convulsive seizure evoked by kindling stimulation was found to produce apoptotic neurons bilaterally in the rat dentate gyrus. The mechanism triggering and mediating apoptotic degeneration is at present being studied. Alterations in the expression and activity of cell-death regulatory proteins such as members of the Bcl-2 family and the cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase (caspase) family occur in regions vulnerable to cell degeneration, suggesting an involvement of these factors in mediating apoptosis following seizures. Findings of decreased apoptotic cell death following administration of caspase inhibitors prior to and following experimentally induced status epilepticus, further suggest a role for caspases in seizure-evoked neuronal degeneration. Intermediate forms of cell death with both necrotic and apoptotic features have been found after seizures and investigation into the detailed mechanisms of the different forms of cell degeneration is needed before attempts to specific prevention can be made.},
  author       = {Bengzon, Johan and Mohapel, Paul and Ekdahl Clementson, Christine and Lindvall, Olle},
  issn         = {1875-7855},
  keyword      = {Chronic : pathology,Dentate Gyrus : pathology,Animal,Disease Models,Kainic Acid,Neurons : pathology,Pilocarpine,Rats,Seizures : chemically induced,Seizures : pathology,Seizures : physiopathology,Brain Damage,Chronic : etiology,Apoptosis},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {111--119},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Progress in Brain Research},
  title        = {Neuronal apoptosis after brief and prolonged seizures.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0079-6123(02)35011-8},
  volume       = {135},
  year         = {2002},
}