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Occupational exposure to hexahydrophthalic anhydride: air analysis, percutaneous absorption, and biological monitoring

Jönsson, Bo A LU ; Welinder, Hans LU ; Hansson, Christer LU and Stahlbom, B (1993) In International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 65(1). p.43-47
Abstract
Urinary hexahydrophthalic acid (HHP acid) levels were determined in 20 workers occupationally exposed to hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) air levels of 11-220 micrograms/m3. The levels of HHP acid in urine increased rapidly during exposure and the decreases were also rapid after the end of exposure. The elimination half-time of HHP acid was 5 h, which was significantly longer than in experimentally exposed volunteers, possibly indicating distribution to more than one compartment. There was a close correlation between time-weighted average levels of HHPA in air and creatinine-adjusted levels of HHP acid in urine collected during the last 4 h of exposure (r = 0.90), indicating that determination of urinary HHP acid levels is suitable as a... (More)
Urinary hexahydrophthalic acid (HHP acid) levels were determined in 20 workers occupationally exposed to hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) air levels of 11-220 micrograms/m3. The levels of HHP acid in urine increased rapidly during exposure and the decreases were also rapid after the end of exposure. The elimination half-time of HHP acid was 5 h, which was significantly longer than in experimentally exposed volunteers, possibly indicating distribution to more than one compartment. There was a close correlation between time-weighted average levels of HHPA in air and creatinine-adjusted levels of HHP acid in urine collected during the last 4 h of exposure (r = 0.90), indicating that determination of urinary HHP acid levels is suitable as a method for biological monitoring of HHPA exposure. An air level of 100 micrograms/m3 corresponded to a postshift urinary HHP acid level of ca. 900 nmol/mmol creatinine in subjects performing light work for 8 h. Percutaneous absorption of HHPA was studied by application of HHPA in petrolatum to the back skin of three volunteers. The excreted amounts of HHP acid in urine, as a fraction of the totally applied amount of HHPA, were within intervals of 1.4%-4.5%, 0.2%-1.3%, and 0%-0.4% respectively, indicating that the contribution from percutaneous absorption is of minor importance in a method for biological monitoring. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Hexahydrophthalic anhydride, Hexahydrophthalic acid, Urine, Skin absorption, Biological monitoring
in
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
volume
65
issue
1
pages
43 - 47
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:8354574
  • scopus:0027508177
ISSN
1432-1246
DOI
10.1007/BF00586057
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34ba5f85-246a-44df-ad2a-294e6bd6903f (old id 1107096)
date added to LUP
2008-07-30 11:20:59
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:21:38
@article{34ba5f85-246a-44df-ad2a-294e6bd6903f,
  abstract     = {Urinary hexahydrophthalic acid (HHP acid) levels were determined in 20 workers occupationally exposed to hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) air levels of 11-220 micrograms/m3. The levels of HHP acid in urine increased rapidly during exposure and the decreases were also rapid after the end of exposure. The elimination half-time of HHP acid was 5 h, which was significantly longer than in experimentally exposed volunteers, possibly indicating distribution to more than one compartment. There was a close correlation between time-weighted average levels of HHPA in air and creatinine-adjusted levels of HHP acid in urine collected during the last 4 h of exposure (r = 0.90), indicating that determination of urinary HHP acid levels is suitable as a method for biological monitoring of HHPA exposure. An air level of 100 micrograms/m3 corresponded to a postshift urinary HHP acid level of ca. 900 nmol/mmol creatinine in subjects performing light work for 8 h. Percutaneous absorption of HHPA was studied by application of HHPA in petrolatum to the back skin of three volunteers. The excreted amounts of HHP acid in urine, as a fraction of the totally applied amount of HHPA, were within intervals of 1.4%-4.5%, 0.2%-1.3%, and 0%-0.4% respectively, indicating that the contribution from percutaneous absorption is of minor importance in a method for biological monitoring.},
  author       = {Jönsson, Bo A and Welinder, Hans and Hansson, Christer and Stahlbom, B},
  issn         = {1432-1246},
  keyword      = {Hexahydrophthalic anhydride,Hexahydrophthalic acid,Urine,Skin absorption,Biological monitoring},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {43--47},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health},
  title        = {Occupational exposure to hexahydrophthalic anhydride: air analysis, percutaneous absorption, and biological monitoring},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00586057},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {1993},
}