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Prevention of progression to severe obesity in a group of obese schoolchildren treated with family therapy

Flodmark, Carl-Erik LU ; Ohlsson, Torsten; Rydén, Olof LU and Sveger, Tomas LU (1993) In Pediatrics 91(5). p.880-884
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of family therapy on childhood obesity. DESIGN. Clinical trial. One year follow-up. SETTING. Referral from school after screening. PARTICIPANTS. Of 1774 children (aged 10 to 11), screened for obesity, 44 obese children were divided into two treatment groups. In an untreated control group of 50 obese children, screened in the same manner, body mass index (BMI) values were recorded twice, at 10 to 11 and at 14 years of age. INTERVENTION. Both treatment groups received comparable dietary counseling and medical checkups for a period of 14 to 18 months, while one of the groups also received family therapy. RESULTS. At the 1-year follow-up, when the children were 14 years of age, intention- to-treat... (More)
STUDY OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of family therapy on childhood obesity. DESIGN. Clinical trial. One year follow-up. SETTING. Referral from school after screening. PARTICIPANTS. Of 1774 children (aged 10 to 11), screened for obesity, 44 obese children were divided into two treatment groups. In an untreated control group of 50 obese children, screened in the same manner, body mass index (BMI) values were recorded twice, at 10 to 11 and at 14 years of age. INTERVENTION. Both treatment groups received comparable dietary counseling and medical checkups for a period of 14 to 18 months, while one of the groups also received family therapy. RESULTS. At the 1-year follow-up, when the children were 14 years of age, intention- to-treat analyses were made of the weight and height data for 39 of 44 children in the two treatment groups and for 48 of the 50 control children. The increase of BMI in the family therapy group was less than in the conventional treatment group at the end of treatment, and less than in the control group (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Moreover, mean BMI was significantly lower in the family therapy group than in the control group (P < .05), and the family therapy group also had fewer children with BMI > 30 than the control group (P = .02). The reduction of triceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, expressed as percentages of the initial values, was significantly greater in the family therapy group than in the conventional treatment group (P = .03, P = .005 and P = .002, respectively), and their physical fitness was significantly better (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS. Family therapy seems to be effective in preventing progression to severe obesity during adolescence if the treatment starts at 10 to 11 years of age. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
family therapy, obesity
in
Pediatrics
volume
91
issue
5
pages
880 - 884
publisher
American Academy of Pediatrics
external identifiers
  • scopus:0027466984
ISSN
1098-4275
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb928e2d-c7e9-45d1-90bf-b52421e3f3d7 (old id 1107567)
alternative location
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/91/5/880
date added to LUP
2008-07-31 11:48:09
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:22:31
@article{eb928e2d-c7e9-45d1-90bf-b52421e3f3d7,
  abstract     = {STUDY OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of family therapy on childhood obesity. DESIGN. Clinical trial. One year follow-up. SETTING. Referral from school after screening. PARTICIPANTS. Of 1774 children (aged 10 to 11), screened for obesity, 44 obese children were divided into two treatment groups. In an untreated control group of 50 obese children, screened in the same manner, body mass index (BMI) values were recorded twice, at 10 to 11 and at 14 years of age. INTERVENTION. Both treatment groups received comparable dietary counseling and medical checkups for a period of 14 to 18 months, while one of the groups also received family therapy. RESULTS. At the 1-year follow-up, when the children were 14 years of age, intention- to-treat analyses were made of the weight and height data for 39 of 44 children in the two treatment groups and for 48 of the 50 control children. The increase of BMI in the family therapy group was less than in the conventional treatment group at the end of treatment, and less than in the control group (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Moreover, mean BMI was significantly lower in the family therapy group than in the control group (P &lt; .05), and the family therapy group also had fewer children with BMI &gt; 30 than the control group (P = .02). The reduction of triceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, expressed as percentages of the initial values, was significantly greater in the family therapy group than in the conventional treatment group (P = .03, P = .005 and P = .002, respectively), and their physical fitness was significantly better (P &lt; .05). CONCLUSIONS. Family therapy seems to be effective in preventing progression to severe obesity during adolescence if the treatment starts at 10 to 11 years of age.},
  author       = {Flodmark, Carl-Erik and Ohlsson, Torsten and Rydén, Olof and Sveger, Tomas},
  issn         = {1098-4275},
  keyword      = {family therapy,obesity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {880--884},
  publisher    = {American Academy of Pediatrics},
  series       = {Pediatrics},
  title        = {Prevention of progression to severe obesity in a group of obese schoolchildren treated with family therapy},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {1993},
}