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Children’s Participation in the Decision-Making Process During Hospitalization: an observational study

Runeson, Ingrid LU ; Kristensson Hallström, Inger LU ; Elander, Gunnel and Hermerén, Göran LU (2002) In Nursing Ethics 9(6). p.583-598
Abstract
Twenty-four children (aged 5 months to 18 years) who were admitted to a university hospital were observed for a total of 135 hours with the aim of describing their degree of participation in decisions concerning their own care. Grading of their participation was made by using a 5-point scale. An assessment was also made of what was considered as optimal participation in each situation. The results indicate that children are not always allowed to participate in decision making to the extent that is considered optimal. In no case was it judged that a child participated in or was forced to make a decision that was too difficult for the child. The interactions between children, parents and staff were also described in connection with... (More)
Twenty-four children (aged 5 months to 18 years) who were admitted to a university hospital were observed for a total of 135 hours with the aim of describing their degree of participation in decisions concerning their own care. Grading of their participation was made by using a 5-point scale. An assessment was also made of what was considered as optimal participation in each situation. The results indicate that children are not always allowed to participate in decision making to the extent that is considered optimal. In no case was it judged that a child participated in or was forced to make a decision that was too difficult for the child. The interactions between children, parents and staff were also described in connection with discussions and decision-making processes. This showed that parents do not always support their children in difficult situations and that health care staff often inform children about what is going to happen without presenting alternatives or asking for their views. Staff may, however, find themselves facing an ethical conflict in deciding between supporting a child’s view or following hospital routine. It is of great importance that children are looked upon as potentially autonomous individuals and that staff members realize that one of their core duties is to facilitate children’s participation in decision making concerning their health care. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nursing Ethics
volume
9
issue
6
article number
6
pages
583 - 598
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • pmid:12449996
  • wos:000179338100004
  • scopus:0036835787
ISSN
1477-0989
DOI
10.1191/0969733002ne553oa
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1863beee-57e8-4ce1-bbf3-9b602601f35a (old id 110972)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12449996&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:50:19
date last changed
2020-12-08 01:56:55
@article{1863beee-57e8-4ce1-bbf3-9b602601f35a,
  abstract     = {Twenty-four children (aged 5 months to 18 years) who were admitted to a university hospital were observed for a total of 135 hours with the aim of describing their degree of participation in decisions concerning their own care. Grading of their participation was made by using a 5-point scale. An assessment was also made of what was considered as optimal participation in each situation. The results indicate that children are not always allowed to participate in decision making to the extent that is considered optimal. In no case was it judged that a child participated in or was forced to make a decision that was too difficult for the child. The interactions between children, parents and staff were also described in connection with discussions and decision-making processes. This showed that parents do not always support their children in difficult situations and that health care staff often inform children about what is going to happen without presenting alternatives or asking for their views. Staff may, however, find themselves facing an ethical conflict in deciding between supporting a child’s view or following hospital routine. It is of great importance that children are looked upon as potentially autonomous individuals and that staff members realize that one of their core duties is to facilitate children’s participation in decision making concerning their health care.},
  author       = {Runeson, Ingrid and Kristensson Hallström, Inger and Elander, Gunnel and Hermerén, Göran},
  issn         = {1477-0989},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {583--598},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  series       = {Nursing Ethics},
  title        = {Children’s Participation in the Decision-Making Process During Hospitalization: an observational study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1191/0969733002ne553oa},
  doi          = {10.1191/0969733002ne553oa},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2002},
}