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Physical Therapists´ emotional expressions in interviews about factors important for interaction with patients

Gard, Gunvor LU ; Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda LU ; Salford, Eva LU and Ekdahl, Charlotte LU (2000) In Physiotherapy 86(5). p.229-240
Abstract
Interactions between patients and physiotherapists have been studied by various researchers. Some results indicate that physiotherapists have an awareness of underlying emotions, but often respond only on an intellectual level. It seems that verbally expressed emotions may be important for interaction between physiotherapists and patients during treatment.

Aim



The aim of this study was to investigate how many and what verbally expressed emotions physiotherapists state during interviews between physiotherapists and patients.

Method



The study was a qualitative case study with cross-case analysis according to Shepard et al (1993) and Merriam (1988). Ten informants participated, all of... (More)
Interactions between patients and physiotherapists have been studied by various researchers. Some results indicate that physiotherapists have an awareness of underlying emotions, but often respond only on an intellectual level. It seems that verbally expressed emotions may be important for interaction between physiotherapists and patients during treatment.

Aim



The aim of this study was to investigate how many and what verbally expressed emotions physiotherapists state during interviews between physiotherapists and patients.

Method



The study was a qualitative case study with cross-case analysis according to Shepard et al (1993) and Merriam (1988). Ten informants participated, all of them 'experts in interaction with patients', women, Swedish-speaking, and with at least five years' experience in primary health care. The physiotherapists' emotions were categorised according to Tomkins (1984) and Izard (1977) in the categories of interest/excitement, surprise/startle, enjoyment/joy, sadness, anger/rage, fear/terror, shame/humiliation, contempt and disgust.

Results



Positive emotions such as interest and joy were expressed most often in the interviews, in situations where physiotherapy had been successful, as joyful contacts with colleagues, or in situations where humour was used as a therapeutic instrument. Surprise, sadness and anger were expressed more seldom and contempt or disgust were not expressed at all in the interviews.

Conclusion



Verbal expressions of emotions in treatment situations in physiotherapy practice should be promoted more emphatically. This may start a reflective process in both patients and physiotherapists and deepen the understanding of the interaction. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Interaction, emotions, qualitative interview, treatment situation
in
Physiotherapy
volume
86
issue
5
pages
229 - 240
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033833362
ISSN
1873-1465
DOI
10.1016/S0031-9406(05)60908-X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e49e5184-ebc4-45ce-b170-071a4de73f5b (old id 1117421)
date added to LUP
2008-06-30 16:17:33
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:32:39
@article{e49e5184-ebc4-45ce-b170-071a4de73f5b,
  abstract     = {Interactions between patients and physiotherapists have been studied by various researchers. Some results indicate that physiotherapists have an awareness of underlying emotions, but often respond only on an intellectual level. It seems that verbally expressed emotions may be important for interaction between physiotherapists and patients during treatment.<br/><br>
Aim<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The aim of this study was to investigate how many and what verbally expressed emotions physiotherapists state during interviews between physiotherapists and patients.<br/><br>
Method<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The study was a qualitative case study with cross-case analysis according to Shepard et al (1993) and Merriam (1988). Ten informants participated, all of them 'experts in interaction with patients', women, Swedish-speaking, and with at least five years' experience in primary health care. The physiotherapists' emotions were categorised according to Tomkins (1984) and Izard (1977) in the categories of interest/excitement, surprise/startle, enjoyment/joy, sadness, anger/rage, fear/terror, shame/humiliation, contempt and disgust.<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Positive emotions such as interest and joy were expressed most often in the interviews, in situations where physiotherapy had been successful, as joyful contacts with colleagues, or in situations where humour was used as a therapeutic instrument. Surprise, sadness and anger were expressed more seldom and contempt or disgust were not expressed at all in the interviews.<br/><br>
Conclusion<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Verbal expressions of emotions in treatment situations in physiotherapy practice should be promoted more emphatically. This may start a reflective process in both patients and physiotherapists and deepen the understanding of the interaction.},
  author       = {Gard, Gunvor and Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda and Salford, Eva and Ekdahl, Charlotte},
  issn         = {1873-1465},
  keyword      = {Interaction,emotions,qualitative interview,treatment situation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {229--240},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Physiotherapy},
  title        = {Physical Therapists´ emotional expressions in interviews about factors important for interaction with patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0031-9406(05)60908-X},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2000},
}