Advanced

Recombinant FVIIa in the treatment of warfarin bleeding

Berntorp, Erik LU (2000) In Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis 26(4). p.433-433
Abstract
Patients receiving oral anticoagulant treatment have abnormally low levels of functional vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteins and consequently a clear risk of hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of hemorrhages has been reported to be around 0.6-0.7% per month at a therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) and the incidence of major hemorrhagic events is substantial. Therefore, the ability to reverse the anti-vitamin K effect is of utmost importance, and if an immediate reversal is necessary, plasma or prothrombin complex concentrates are used. As plasma-derived products carry the risk of transmission of blood-borne viruses and also of thromboembolic complications, it is desirable to test new potential tools for oral... (More)
Patients receiving oral anticoagulant treatment have abnormally low levels of functional vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteins and consequently a clear risk of hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of hemorrhages has been reported to be around 0.6-0.7% per month at a therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) and the incidence of major hemorrhagic events is substantial. Therefore, the ability to reverse the anti-vitamin K effect is of utmost importance, and if an immediate reversal is necessary, plasma or prothrombin complex concentrates are used. As plasma-derived products carry the risk of transmission of blood-borne viruses and also of thromboembolic complications, it is desirable to test new potential tools for oral anticoagulant reversal. Recombinant factor VIIa (FVIIa) has been tested in rats and humans treated with antivitamin K drugs with seemingly good effect on hemostasis and laboratory parameters. Even if more data are needed before any definite conclusions can be drawn, the outlook so far seems promising. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
volume
26
issue
4
pages
433 - 433
publisher
Georg Thieme Verlag
external identifiers
  • pmid:11092220
  • scopus:0033763661
ISSN
1098-9064
DOI
10.1055/s-2000-8464
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
102fb002-a948-49e1-bf8a-f141d25315e8 (old id 1117539)
date added to LUP
2008-06-27 14:18:56
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:20:49
@article{102fb002-a948-49e1-bf8a-f141d25315e8,
  abstract     = {Patients receiving oral anticoagulant treatment have abnormally low levels of functional vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteins and consequently a clear risk of hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of hemorrhages has been reported to be around 0.6-0.7% per month at a therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) and the incidence of major hemorrhagic events is substantial. Therefore, the ability to reverse the anti-vitamin K effect is of utmost importance, and if an immediate reversal is necessary, plasma or prothrombin complex concentrates are used. As plasma-derived products carry the risk of transmission of blood-borne viruses and also of thromboembolic complications, it is desirable to test new potential tools for oral anticoagulant reversal. Recombinant factor VIIa (FVIIa) has been tested in rats and humans treated with antivitamin K drugs with seemingly good effect on hemostasis and laboratory parameters. Even if more data are needed before any definite conclusions can be drawn, the outlook so far seems promising.},
  author       = {Berntorp, Erik},
  issn         = {1098-9064},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {433--433},
  publisher    = {Georg Thieme Verlag},
  series       = {Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis},
  title        = {Recombinant FVIIa in the treatment of warfarin bleeding},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2000-8464},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2000},
}