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Effect kinetics of desmopressin-induced platelet retention in healthy volunteers treated with aspirin or placebo

Lethagen, Stefan LU ; Olofsson, L; Frick, K; Berntorp, Erik LU and Björkman, S (2000) In Haemophilia 6(1). p.15-20
Abstract
Desmopressin is often used for haemostatic treatment in platelet dysfunction, but the effect kinetics of platelet responses and the mechanism of action are poorly known. This study aimed to determine the kinetics of platelet function responses induced by desmopressin in healthy volunteers treated with aspirin or placebo. Another aim was to correlate platelet responses to changes of von Willebrand factor (vWF) in plasma. We measured platelet function with a glass bead retention test, Ivy bleeding time, vWF:Ag and multimeric structure in plasma. Median baseline platelet retention was 12% (normal reference range 16-27%) during aspirin treatment and 18% during placebo. Median peak platelet retention after desmopressin was 33% during aspirin... (More)
Desmopressin is often used for haemostatic treatment in platelet dysfunction, but the effect kinetics of platelet responses and the mechanism of action are poorly known. This study aimed to determine the kinetics of platelet function responses induced by desmopressin in healthy volunteers treated with aspirin or placebo. Another aim was to correlate platelet responses to changes of von Willebrand factor (vWF) in plasma. We measured platelet function with a glass bead retention test, Ivy bleeding time, vWF:Ag and multimeric structure in plasma. Median baseline platelet retention was 12% (normal reference range 16-27%) during aspirin treatment and 18% during placebo. Median peak platelet retention after desmopressin was 33% during aspirin treatment and 34% during placebo. After about 3 h platelet function had returned to baseline. A second desmopressin dose after 3 h stimulated platelet retention to a similar extent as the first dose. There was no correlation between platelet responses and quantitative or qualitative changes of vWF in plasma. Platelet count did not change significantly. Thus, desmopressin's effect on platelet function lasts for about 3 h, but may be prolonged by a second dose immediately thereafter. These findings may have important clinical implications for patients with aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction undergoing surgery. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Haemophilia
volume
6
issue
1
pages
15 - 20
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:10632736
  • scopus:0033994081
ISSN
1351-8216
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2516.2000.00355.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e9f7d154-0b4e-4396-9fe7-6b5bd64abf8c (old id 1117578)
date added to LUP
2008-06-27 12:15:42
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:35:37
@article{e9f7d154-0b4e-4396-9fe7-6b5bd64abf8c,
  abstract     = {Desmopressin is often used for haemostatic treatment in platelet dysfunction, but the effect kinetics of platelet responses and the mechanism of action are poorly known. This study aimed to determine the kinetics of platelet function responses induced by desmopressin in healthy volunteers treated with aspirin or placebo. Another aim was to correlate platelet responses to changes of von Willebrand factor (vWF) in plasma. We measured platelet function with a glass bead retention test, Ivy bleeding time, vWF:Ag and multimeric structure in plasma. Median baseline platelet retention was 12% (normal reference range 16-27%) during aspirin treatment and 18% during placebo. Median peak platelet retention after desmopressin was 33% during aspirin treatment and 34% during placebo. After about 3 h platelet function had returned to baseline. A second desmopressin dose after 3 h stimulated platelet retention to a similar extent as the first dose. There was no correlation between platelet responses and quantitative or qualitative changes of vWF in plasma. Platelet count did not change significantly. Thus, desmopressin's effect on platelet function lasts for about 3 h, but may be prolonged by a second dose immediately thereafter. These findings may have important clinical implications for patients with aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction undergoing surgery.},
  author       = {Lethagen, Stefan and Olofsson, L and Frick, K and Berntorp, Erik and Björkman, S},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15--20},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {Effect kinetics of desmopressin-induced platelet retention in healthy volunteers treated with aspirin or placebo},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2516.2000.00355.x},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2000},
}