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Pure motor stroke from presumed lacunar infarct - Long-term prognosis for survival and risk of recurrent stroke

Staaf, Gert LU ; Lindgren, Arne LU and Norrving, Bo LU (2001) In Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation 32(11). p.2592-2596
Abstract
Background and Purpose-A low risk of recurrent stroke and death after lacunar infarction has previously been reported, but follow-up has been limited to less than or equal to5 years. Methods-One hundred eighty patients with pure motor stroke, collected between 1983 and 1986 from a hospital-based stroke registry, were followed up until at least 10 years after the index stroke. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Survival status was determined from the official population registry and compared with survival rates of the Swedish population, matched for age and sex. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify independent prognostic predictors. Results-During follow-up 106 (60%) of the 178 patients died, most commonly as... (More)
Background and Purpose-A low risk of recurrent stroke and death after lacunar infarction has previously been reported, but follow-up has been limited to less than or equal to5 years. Methods-One hundred eighty patients with pure motor stroke, collected between 1983 and 1986 from a hospital-based stroke registry, were followed up until at least 10 years after the index stroke. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Survival status was determined from the official population registry and compared with survival rates of the Swedish population, matched for age and sex. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify independent prognostic predictors. Results-During follow-up 106 (60%) of the 178 patients died, most commonly as a result of coronary heart disease. During the first 5 years after the stroke, survival rates were similar to those of the general population. Beyond this time the risk of death was increased among patients with pure motor stroke, with an excess of 10 to 15 percent units compared with the general population. Independent determinants for death were age (P <0.01), male sex (P <0.01), and nonuse of acetylsalicylic acid (P=0.02). Recurrent stroke occurred in 42 (23.5%) of the patients, corresponding to an annual risk of 2.4%. Hypertension (P=0.025) and diabetes (P=0.024) were independent risk factors for recurrent stroke. Conclusions-For the first few years after lacunar infarct, the risk of death was similar to that of the general population, but later a clear excess of death was observed. The long-term prognosis in lacunar infarction appears less favorable than previously reported. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
outcome, natural history, mortality, lacunar infarction, hypertension, cerebral infarction, diabetes mellitus, prognosis, risk factors, stroke, stroke outcome
in
Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation
volume
32
issue
11
pages
2592 - 2596
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000172059800026
  • scopus:0035160482
ISSN
1524-4628
DOI
10.1161/hs1101.098355
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1efcb56d-fdcb-4628-a18a-906218d7c70d (old id 1118688)
date added to LUP
2008-07-15 09:42:15
date last changed
2018-08-19 04:04:35
@article{1efcb56d-fdcb-4628-a18a-906218d7c70d,
  abstract     = {Background and Purpose-A low risk of recurrent stroke and death after lacunar infarction has previously been reported, but follow-up has been limited to less than or equal to5 years. Methods-One hundred eighty patients with pure motor stroke, collected between 1983 and 1986 from a hospital-based stroke registry, were followed up until at least 10 years after the index stroke. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Survival status was determined from the official population registry and compared with survival rates of the Swedish population, matched for age and sex. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify independent prognostic predictors. Results-During follow-up 106 (60%) of the 178 patients died, most commonly as a result of coronary heart disease. During the first 5 years after the stroke, survival rates were similar to those of the general population. Beyond this time the risk of death was increased among patients with pure motor stroke, with an excess of 10 to 15 percent units compared with the general population. Independent determinants for death were age (P &lt;0.01), male sex (P &lt;0.01), and nonuse of acetylsalicylic acid (P=0.02). Recurrent stroke occurred in 42 (23.5%) of the patients, corresponding to an annual risk of 2.4%. Hypertension (P=0.025) and diabetes (P=0.024) were independent risk factors for recurrent stroke. Conclusions-For the first few years after lacunar infarct, the risk of death was similar to that of the general population, but later a clear excess of death was observed. The long-term prognosis in lacunar infarction appears less favorable than previously reported.},
  author       = {Staaf, Gert and Lindgren, Arne and Norrving, Bo},
  issn         = {1524-4628},
  keyword      = {outcome,natural history,mortality,lacunar infarction,hypertension,cerebral infarction,diabetes mellitus,prognosis,risk factors,stroke,stroke outcome},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2592--2596},
  publisher    = {American Heart Association},
  series       = { Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation},
  title        = {Pure motor stroke from presumed lacunar infarct - Long-term prognosis for survival and risk of recurrent stroke},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/hs1101.098355},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2001},
}