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Neural regeneration along longitudinal polyglactin sutures across short and extended defects in the rat sciatic nerve

Scherman, Peter LU ; Lundborg, Göran LU ; Kanje, Martin LU and Dahlin, Lars LU (2001) In Journal of Neurosurgery 95(2). p.316-323
Abstract
Object. The authors have previously shown that longitudinal sutures without artificial tube support regeneration across a 7-mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. In the present study, the authors, compared this new approach with the use of autologous nerve grafts across short defects and examined whether the approach could be used to support regeneration across extended gaps and whether the interposition of a short nerve segment (the stepping-stone procedure) was applicable in this model. Methods. Longitudinal sutures were used to bridge 7- and 15-mm gaps in the rat sciatic nerve. Contralateral comparisons were made to nerve autografts in the 7-mm group and to sutures plus a short interposed nerve segment in the 15-mm group. Regeneration was... (More)
Object. The authors have previously shown that longitudinal sutures without artificial tube support regeneration across a 7-mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. In the present study, the authors, compared this new approach with the use of autologous nerve grafts across short defects and examined whether the approach could be used to support regeneration across extended gaps and whether the interposition of a short nerve segment (the stepping-stone procedure) was applicable in this model. Methods. Longitudinal sutures were used to bridge 7- and 15-mm gaps in the rat sciatic nerve. Contralateral comparisons were made to nerve autografts in the 7-mm group and to sutures plus a short interposed nerve segment in the 15-mm group. Regeneration was evaluated at 2, 4, and 12 weeks by using immunocytochemical analysis for Schwann cells, neurofilament protein, and macrophages and at 12 weeks also by using histological examination, including morphometry in the distal tibial trunk and tetanic force measurements in the gastrocnemius muscle. Conclusions. The authors found that the results of regeneration after repair with longitudinal polyglactin sutures across short defects were not significantly different from those produced by the use of autologous nerve grafts. Regeneration, although poor, occurred along sutures across extended gaps and was significantly enhanced by an interposed nerve segment acting as a Schwann cell resource in this model. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
nerve regeneration, absorbable suture, nerve graft, interposed nerve segment, Schwann cell, muscle force, nerve fiber
in
Journal of Neurosurgery
volume
95
issue
2
pages
316 - 323
publisher
American Association of Neurosurgeons
external identifiers
  • wos:000170254500019
  • scopus:0034860060
ISSN
0022-3085
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cfc6b324-f982-4f64-8348-813b86ae27f2 (old id 1119019)
date added to LUP
2008-07-14 10:39:16
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:14:29
@article{cfc6b324-f982-4f64-8348-813b86ae27f2,
  abstract     = {Object. The authors have previously shown that longitudinal sutures without artificial tube support regeneration across a 7-mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. In the present study, the authors, compared this new approach with the use of autologous nerve grafts across short defects and examined whether the approach could be used to support regeneration across extended gaps and whether the interposition of a short nerve segment (the stepping-stone procedure) was applicable in this model. Methods. Longitudinal sutures were used to bridge 7- and 15-mm gaps in the rat sciatic nerve. Contralateral comparisons were made to nerve autografts in the 7-mm group and to sutures plus a short interposed nerve segment in the 15-mm group. Regeneration was evaluated at 2, 4, and 12 weeks by using immunocytochemical analysis for Schwann cells, neurofilament protein, and macrophages and at 12 weeks also by using histological examination, including morphometry in the distal tibial trunk and tetanic force measurements in the gastrocnemius muscle. Conclusions. The authors found that the results of regeneration after repair with longitudinal polyglactin sutures across short defects were not significantly different from those produced by the use of autologous nerve grafts. Regeneration, although poor, occurred along sutures across extended gaps and was significantly enhanced by an interposed nerve segment acting as a Schwann cell resource in this model.},
  author       = {Scherman, Peter and Lundborg, Göran and Kanje, Martin and Dahlin, Lars},
  issn         = {0022-3085},
  keyword      = {nerve regeneration,absorbable suture,nerve graft,interposed nerve segment,Schwann cell,muscle force,nerve fiber},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {316--323},
  publisher    = {American Association of Neurosurgeons},
  series       = {Journal of Neurosurgery},
  title        = {Neural regeneration along longitudinal polyglactin sutures across short and extended defects in the rat sciatic nerve},
  volume       = {95},
  year         = {2001},
}