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The peritoneal microcirculation in peritoneal dialysis

Rippe, Bengt LU ; Rosengren, B I and Venturoli, Daniele LU (2001) In Microcirculation 8(5). p.303-320
Abstract
This paper deals with the peritoneal microcirculation and with peritoneal exchange occurring in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The capillary wall is a major barrier to solute and water exchange across the peritoneal membrane. There is a bimodal size-selectivity of solute transport between blood and the peritoneal cavity, through pores of radius approximately 40-50 A as well as through a very low number of large pores of radius approximately 250 A. Furthermore, during glucose-induced osmosis during PD, nearly 40% of the total osmotic water flow occurs through molecular water channels, termed "aquaporin-1." This causes an inequality between 1 - sigma and the sieving coefficient for small solutes, which is a key feature of the "three-pore model"... (More)
This paper deals with the peritoneal microcirculation and with peritoneal exchange occurring in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The capillary wall is a major barrier to solute and water exchange across the peritoneal membrane. There is a bimodal size-selectivity of solute transport between blood and the peritoneal cavity, through pores of radius approximately 40-50 A as well as through a very low number of large pores of radius approximately 250 A. Furthermore, during glucose-induced osmosis during PD, nearly 40% of the total osmotic water flow occurs through molecular water channels, termed "aquaporin-1." This causes an inequality between 1 - sigma and the sieving coefficient for small solutes, which is a key feature of the "three-pore model" of peritoneal transport. The peritoneal interstitium, coupled in series with the capillary walls, markedly modifies small-solute transport and makes large-solute transport asymmetric. Thus, although severely restricted in the blood-to-peritoneal direction, the absorption of large solutes from the peritoneal cavity occurs at a high clearance rate ( approximately 1 mL/min), largely independent of molecular radius. True absorption of macromolecules to the blood via lymphatics, however, seems to be occurring at a rate of approximately 0.2 mL/min. Several controversial issues regarding transcapillary and transperitoneal exchange mechanisms are discussed in this paper. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Microcirculation
volume
8
issue
5
pages
303 - 320
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:11687943
  • scopus:0035486937
ISSN
1549-8719
DOI
10.1038/sj/mn/7800106
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f83ea77-5a44-4efd-99e9-d2f9e3da06cc (old id 1119843)
date added to LUP
2008-07-11 14:28:43
date last changed
2018-07-15 03:36:05
@article{2f83ea77-5a44-4efd-99e9-d2f9e3da06cc,
  abstract     = {This paper deals with the peritoneal microcirculation and with peritoneal exchange occurring in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The capillary wall is a major barrier to solute and water exchange across the peritoneal membrane. There is a bimodal size-selectivity of solute transport between blood and the peritoneal cavity, through pores of radius approximately 40-50 A as well as through a very low number of large pores of radius approximately 250 A. Furthermore, during glucose-induced osmosis during PD, nearly 40% of the total osmotic water flow occurs through molecular water channels, termed "aquaporin-1." This causes an inequality between 1 - sigma and the sieving coefficient for small solutes, which is a key feature of the "three-pore model" of peritoneal transport. The peritoneal interstitium, coupled in series with the capillary walls, markedly modifies small-solute transport and makes large-solute transport asymmetric. Thus, although severely restricted in the blood-to-peritoneal direction, the absorption of large solutes from the peritoneal cavity occurs at a high clearance rate ( approximately 1 mL/min), largely independent of molecular radius. True absorption of macromolecules to the blood via lymphatics, however, seems to be occurring at a rate of approximately 0.2 mL/min. Several controversial issues regarding transcapillary and transperitoneal exchange mechanisms are discussed in this paper.},
  author       = {Rippe, Bengt and Rosengren, B I and Venturoli, Daniele},
  issn         = {1549-8719},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {303--320},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Microcirculation},
  title        = {The peritoneal microcirculation in peritoneal dialysis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj/mn/7800106},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2001},
}