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Long-term effects on cholesterol levels and the utilization of lipid-lowering drugs of a hospital based programme for seconadry prevention of coronary artery disease

Stagmo, Martin LU ; Westin, L; Carlsson, R and Israelsson, B (2001) In European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation 8(4). p.243-248
Abstract
Background: The study was designed to determine whether a 1-year hospital-based secondary prevention programme would have any long-term effects on serum lipid levels and the use of lipid-lowering drugs in patients with coronary artery disease 4 years after referral to primary care facilities for follow-up.



Design/methods: After acute myocardial infarction or coronary bypass surgery, 241 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to conventional care (CC) by the primary health care facilities or to a 1-year hospital-based secondary prevention programme (SPP) with target levels for serum cholesterol (<5.2 mmol/l) and triglycerides (<1.5 mmol/l). After 1 year all patients were referred to the primary care sector for... (More)
Background: The study was designed to determine whether a 1-year hospital-based secondary prevention programme would have any long-term effects on serum lipid levels and the use of lipid-lowering drugs in patients with coronary artery disease 4 years after referral to primary care facilities for follow-up.



Design/methods: After acute myocardial infarction or coronary bypass surgery, 241 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to conventional care (CC) by the primary health care facilities or to a 1-year hospital-based secondary prevention programme (SPP) with target levels for serum cholesterol (<5.2 mmol/l) and triglycerides (<1.5 mmol/l). After 1 year all patients were referred to the primary care sector for a further 4-year follow-up.



Results: At the 1-year follow-up there was a significant decrease in serum cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the SPP group but no change in the CC group, and lipid-lowering drugs were used more frequently in the SPP group. These changes were maintained after 5 years. The proportion of patients achieving target serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were larger in the SPP group.



Conclusions: Initiatives regarding cholesterol lowering and drug treatment taken by specialists within a structured hospital-based SPP have long-term impact. Accordingly, drug treatment should be initiated and adjusted to adequate doses before patients are referred to primary care for follow-up. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation
volume
8
issue
4
pages
243 - 248
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
1741-8275
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b574ac35-7dfc-4c62-a8dc-5fe34616a588 (old id 1121437)
date added to LUP
2008-07-15 09:57:27
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:04:22
@article{b574ac35-7dfc-4c62-a8dc-5fe34616a588,
  abstract     = {Background: The study was designed to determine whether a 1-year hospital-based secondary prevention programme would have any long-term effects on serum lipid levels and the use of lipid-lowering drugs in patients with coronary artery disease 4 years after referral to primary care facilities for follow-up.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design/methods: After acute myocardial infarction or coronary bypass surgery, 241 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to conventional care (CC) by the primary health care facilities or to a 1-year hospital-based secondary prevention programme (SPP) with target levels for serum cholesterol (&lt;5.2 mmol/l) and triglycerides (&lt;1.5 mmol/l). After 1 year all patients were referred to the primary care sector for a further 4-year follow-up.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: At the 1-year follow-up there was a significant decrease in serum cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the SPP group but no change in the CC group, and lipid-lowering drugs were used more frequently in the SPP group. These changes were maintained after 5 years. The proportion of patients achieving target serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were larger in the SPP group.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: Initiatives regarding cholesterol lowering and drug treatment taken by specialists within a structured hospital-based SPP have long-term impact. Accordingly, drug treatment should be initiated and adjusted to adequate doses before patients are referred to primary care for follow-up.},
  author       = {Stagmo, Martin and Westin, L and Carlsson, R and Israelsson, B},
  issn         = {1741-8275},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {243--248},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Long-term effects on cholesterol levels and the utilization of lipid-lowering drugs of a hospital based programme for seconadry prevention of coronary artery disease},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2001},
}