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Neuropathological correlates to clinically defined dementia with Lewy bodies

Londos, Elisabet LU ; Passant, Ulla LU ; Gustafson, Lars LU and Brun, Arne LU (2001) In International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 16(7). p.667-679
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To analyse the neuropathological changes behind clinically defined dementia with Lewy bodies (clinDLB) compared with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (clinAD). METHODS: The prevalence of neuropathological findings in 48 clinDLB and 45 clinAD cases was compared. Sixteen clinDLB and 10 clinAD cases were reassessed with alpha-synuclein staining for Lewy bodies (LB). RESULTS: Alzheimer pathology was found in 81% of the clinDLB and 93% of the clinAD cases. The clinDLB group had a higher prevalence of frontal white matter pathology, mostly of ischemic type, and a more severe degeneration of the substantia nigra compared with the clinAD group. In hematoxylin-eosin staining, LBs were identified in seven (15%) of the clinDLB and... (More)
OBJECTIVES: To analyse the neuropathological changes behind clinically defined dementia with Lewy bodies (clinDLB) compared with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (clinAD). METHODS: The prevalence of neuropathological findings in 48 clinDLB and 45 clinAD cases was compared. Sixteen clinDLB and 10 clinAD cases were reassessed with alpha-synuclein staining for Lewy bodies (LB). RESULTS: Alzheimer pathology was found in 81% of the clinDLB and 93% of the clinAD cases. The clinDLB group had a higher prevalence of frontal white matter pathology, mostly of ischemic type, and a more severe degeneration of the substantia nigra compared with the clinAD group. In hematoxylin-eosin staining, LBs were identified in seven (15%) of the clinDLB and in four (9%) of the clinAD group. In alpha-synuclein staining, 38% of the clinDLB and 40% of the clinAD cases exhibited LBs. The cases without LBs, in the clinDLB group, had AD pathology in combination with frontal white matter disease. Vascular pathology of significant degree was prevalent in more than 40% of all the cases with verified LBs regardless of clinical diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Consecutive dementia cases, fulfilling the clinical consensus criteria for DLB, may exhibit combinations of neuropathological changes which in themselves can explain the clinical picture of DLB even when LBs are absent. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lewy body dementia, Alzheimer pathology, white matter disease, Alzheimer's disease, substantia nigra, vascular pathology, neuropathology
in
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
volume
16
issue
7
pages
667 - 679
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:11466745
  • scopus:0034864708
ISSN
1099-1166
DOI
10.1002/gps.403
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Department of Psychogeriatrics (013304000), Psychiatry/Primary Care/Public Health (013240500), Clinical Memory Research Unit (013242610), Division IV (013230800)
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758c133c-8db3-441e-bd62-5c340eae7c3c (old id 1121707)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:43:34
date last changed
2021-01-06 08:55:05
@article{758c133c-8db3-441e-bd62-5c340eae7c3c,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: To analyse the neuropathological changes behind clinically defined dementia with Lewy bodies (clinDLB) compared with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (clinAD). METHODS: The prevalence of neuropathological findings in 48 clinDLB and 45 clinAD cases was compared. Sixteen clinDLB and 10 clinAD cases were reassessed with alpha-synuclein staining for Lewy bodies (LB). RESULTS: Alzheimer pathology was found in 81% of the clinDLB and 93% of the clinAD cases. The clinDLB group had a higher prevalence of frontal white matter pathology, mostly of ischemic type, and a more severe degeneration of the substantia nigra compared with the clinAD group. In hematoxylin-eosin staining, LBs were identified in seven (15%) of the clinDLB and in four (9%) of the clinAD group. In alpha-synuclein staining, 38% of the clinDLB and 40% of the clinAD cases exhibited LBs. The cases without LBs, in the clinDLB group, had AD pathology in combination with frontal white matter disease. Vascular pathology of significant degree was prevalent in more than 40% of all the cases with verified LBs regardless of clinical diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Consecutive dementia cases, fulfilling the clinical consensus criteria for DLB, may exhibit combinations of neuropathological changes which in themselves can explain the clinical picture of DLB even when LBs are absent.},
  author       = {Londos, Elisabet and Passant, Ulla and Gustafson, Lars and Brun, Arne},
  issn         = {1099-1166},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {667--679},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
  title        = {Neuropathological correlates to clinically defined dementia with Lewy bodies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.403},
  doi          = {10.1002/gps.403},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2001},
}