Advanced

Novel word learning and its relation to working memory and language in children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment

Sahlén, Birgitta LU and Hansson, Kristina LU (2006) In Journal of Multilingual Communication Disorders 4(2). p.95-107
Abstract
Twelve children with mild/moderate hearing impairment (HI) and 12 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 5 - 9 years old, were assessed in order to compare novel word learning and to study cognitive and linguistic predictors for word learning. There was no significant difference on novel word learning between the groups. The strongest predictor for novel word learning was a lexical measure. When 22 of the participants were categorized as high versus low performing children, the children with HI and SLI were equally distributed. Low performers on novel word learning were significantly poorer on non-word repetition, lexicon and language comprehension than high performers. Our data are inconclusive as to the influence of hearing... (More)
Twelve children with mild/moderate hearing impairment (HI) and 12 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 5 - 9 years old, were assessed in order to compare novel word learning and to study cognitive and linguistic predictors for word learning. There was no significant difference on novel word learning between the groups. The strongest predictor for novel word learning was a lexical measure. When 22 of the participants were categorized as high versus low performing children, the children with HI and SLI were equally distributed. Low performers on novel word learning were significantly poorer on non-word repetition, lexicon and language comprehension than high performers. Our data are inconclusive as to the influence of hearing levels in children with HI as a group, but individual results indicate sensory as well cognitive mechanisms behind poor word learning. Generally, our data support earlier findings showing that novel word learning is easier the richer the child's vocabulary and the better the phonological short-term memory. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Working memory, lexicon, Swedish preschool, school children
in
Journal of Multilingual Communication Disorders
volume
4
issue
2
pages
95 - 107
DOI
10.1080/14769670600929360
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
73acf90f-c4d6-47a7-845f-1a64a7806560 (old id 1136392)
date added to LUP
2008-06-11 13:46:22
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:46:15
@article{73acf90f-c4d6-47a7-845f-1a64a7806560,
  abstract     = {Twelve children with mild/moderate hearing impairment (HI) and 12 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 5 - 9 years old, were assessed in order to compare novel word learning and to study cognitive and linguistic predictors for word learning. There was no significant difference on novel word learning between the groups. The strongest predictor for novel word learning was a lexical measure. When 22 of the participants were categorized as high versus low performing children, the children with HI and SLI were equally distributed. Low performers on novel word learning were significantly poorer on non-word repetition, lexicon and language comprehension than high performers. Our data are inconclusive as to the influence of hearing levels in children with HI as a group, but individual results indicate sensory as well cognitive mechanisms behind poor word learning. Generally, our data support earlier findings showing that novel word learning is easier the richer the child's vocabulary and the better the phonological short-term memory.},
  author       = {Sahlén, Birgitta and Hansson, Kristina},
  keyword      = {Working memory,lexicon,Swedish preschool,school children},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {95--107},
  series       = {Journal of Multilingual Communication Disorders},
  title        = {Novel word learning and its relation to working memory and language in children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14769670600929360},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2006},
}