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The role of uncoupling proteins in the regulation of metabolism.

Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte LU (2003) In Acta Physiologica Scandinavica1888-12-31+01:002006-01-01+01:00 178(4). p.405-412
Abstract
Investigations of variations in metabolic efficiency and thermogenesis have a short and turbulent history. In small animals, non-shivering thermogenesis and diet-induced thermogenesis have a great impact on overall body weight, and the question is whether mechanisms to waste energy have evolved also in human energy metabolism. The candidate molecules for this adaptive thermogenesis are the uncoupling proteins. This is a newly discovered family of proteins, consisting of at least five proteins, namely UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5. Although a role for UCP1 in thermogenesis is unequivocal, the physiological function of the newer uncoupling proteins is as yet unclear. UCP1 is present in brown adipose tissue and has a well-documented role in... (More)
Investigations of variations in metabolic efficiency and thermogenesis have a short and turbulent history. In small animals, non-shivering thermogenesis and diet-induced thermogenesis have a great impact on overall body weight, and the question is whether mechanisms to waste energy have evolved also in human energy metabolism. The candidate molecules for this adaptive thermogenesis are the uncoupling proteins. This is a newly discovered family of proteins, consisting of at least five proteins, namely UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5. Although a role for UCP1 in thermogenesis is unequivocal, the physiological function of the newer uncoupling proteins is as yet unclear. UCP1 is present in brown adipose tissue and has a well-documented role in cold-induced thermogenesis. The targeted disruption of the UCP1-gene rendered animals that were cold sensitive, but not obese. UCP2 mRNA has a ubiquitous distribution in tissue, namely, in skeletal muscle, white and brown adipose tissue, the gastro-intestinal tract, the lung and the spleen. By targeting the UCP2-gene there was no effect on whole body energy metabolism, but instead, a reduced ability to protect against free-radical oxygen species. UCP2 has also been shown to act as a negative regulator for insulin secretion. UCP3 is present in skeletal muscle. Targeted disruption of the UCP3-gene gave no effect on whole body energy metabolism, but showed the mitochondria in muscle to be more coupled. In conclusion, the uncoupling proteins may be important in various specific ways, as protectors of free radical oxygen species and as regulators of ATP-dependent processes. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Physiologica Scandinavica1888-12-31+01:002006-01-01+01:00
volume
178
issue
4
pages
405 - 412
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000184689800015
  • pmid:12864746
  • scopus:0042160141
ISSN
0001-6772
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0dc377d-2906-4a9f-af9f-1bb923bb81e7 (old id 116357)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12864746&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 08:45:44
date last changed
2018-06-24 04:35:25
@article{f0dc377d-2906-4a9f-af9f-1bb923bb81e7,
  abstract     = {Investigations of variations in metabolic efficiency and thermogenesis have a short and turbulent history. In small animals, non-shivering thermogenesis and diet-induced thermogenesis have a great impact on overall body weight, and the question is whether mechanisms to waste energy have evolved also in human energy metabolism. The candidate molecules for this adaptive thermogenesis are the uncoupling proteins. This is a newly discovered family of proteins, consisting of at least five proteins, namely UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5. Although a role for UCP1 in thermogenesis is unequivocal, the physiological function of the newer uncoupling proteins is as yet unclear. UCP1 is present in brown adipose tissue and has a well-documented role in cold-induced thermogenesis. The targeted disruption of the UCP1-gene rendered animals that were cold sensitive, but not obese. UCP2 mRNA has a ubiquitous distribution in tissue, namely, in skeletal muscle, white and brown adipose tissue, the gastro-intestinal tract, the lung and the spleen. By targeting the UCP2-gene there was no effect on whole body energy metabolism, but instead, a reduced ability to protect against free-radical oxygen species. UCP2 has also been shown to act as a negative regulator for insulin secretion. UCP3 is present in skeletal muscle. Targeted disruption of the UCP3-gene gave no effect on whole body energy metabolism, but showed the mitochondria in muscle to be more coupled. In conclusion, the uncoupling proteins may be important in various specific ways, as protectors of free radical oxygen species and as regulators of ATP-dependent processes.},
  author       = {Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte},
  issn         = {0001-6772},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {405--412},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Physiologica Scandinavica1888-12-31+01:002006-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {The role of uncoupling proteins in the regulation of metabolism.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {178},
  year         = {2003},
}