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Cognitive dysfunction 24-31 years after isolated optic neuritis.

Nilsson, Petra LU ; Rorsman, Ia LU ; Larsson, E M; Norrving, Bo LU and Sandberg Wollheim, Magnhild LU (2008) In Multiple Sclerosis 14. p.913-918
Abstract
Objective Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but long-term data on cognition in patients with clinically isolated syndromes are sparse. Methods We determined cognitive functions in 22 patients 44-75 years old diagnosed with optic neuritis 24-31 years earlier but had no further clinical bouts and had not progressed clinically to MS. We used a neuropsychological test battery covering nine cognitive domains. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain had been performed earlier and was normal in six patients and showed two or more white matter abnormalities compatible with demyelinating lesions in 16 patients. Results On neuropsychological testing, one patient was within normal range on all tests, six subjects... (More)
Objective Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but long-term data on cognition in patients with clinically isolated syndromes are sparse. Methods We determined cognitive functions in 22 patients 44-75 years old diagnosed with optic neuritis 24-31 years earlier but had no further clinical bouts and had not progressed clinically to MS. We used a neuropsychological test battery covering nine cognitive domains. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain had been performed earlier and was normal in six patients and showed two or more white matter abnormalities compatible with demyelinating lesions in 16 patients. Results On neuropsychological testing, one patient was within normal range on all tests, six subjects showed borderline results, and 15 patients (68%) showed significantly impaired performance in at least one cognitive domain. Seven patients showed significant impairment in two or more domains. Executive function, visuo-spatial ability, and information processing speed were the most frequently affected domains. There was no apparent correlation between MRI findings and cognitive function. Conclusions We conclude that cognitive dysfunction is common in patients many years after clinically isolated optic neuritis. Cognitive dysfunction was found even in patients who had no apparent demyelinating lesions on follow-up MRI. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Multiple Sclerosis
volume
14
pages
913 - 918
publisher
Arnold, Hodder Headline PLC
external identifiers
  • wos:000258587500007
  • pmid:18573827
  • scopus:54449085014
ISSN
1477-0970
DOI
10.1177/1352458508090669
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8020d6e3-a08a-40a9-9c70-fb7e7a446c55 (old id 1168555)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18573827?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-07-02 14:55:32
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:31:18
@article{8020d6e3-a08a-40a9-9c70-fb7e7a446c55,
  abstract     = {Objective Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but long-term data on cognition in patients with clinically isolated syndromes are sparse. Methods We determined cognitive functions in 22 patients 44-75 years old diagnosed with optic neuritis 24-31 years earlier but had no further clinical bouts and had not progressed clinically to MS. We used a neuropsychological test battery covering nine cognitive domains. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain had been performed earlier and was normal in six patients and showed two or more white matter abnormalities compatible with demyelinating lesions in 16 patients. Results On neuropsychological testing, one patient was within normal range on all tests, six subjects showed borderline results, and 15 patients (68%) showed significantly impaired performance in at least one cognitive domain. Seven patients showed significant impairment in two or more domains. Executive function, visuo-spatial ability, and information processing speed were the most frequently affected domains. There was no apparent correlation between MRI findings and cognitive function. Conclusions We conclude that cognitive dysfunction is common in patients many years after clinically isolated optic neuritis. Cognitive dysfunction was found even in patients who had no apparent demyelinating lesions on follow-up MRI.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Petra and Rorsman, Ia and Larsson, E M and Norrving, Bo and Sandberg Wollheim, Magnhild},
  issn         = {1477-0970},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {913--918},
  publisher    = {Arnold, Hodder Headline PLC},
  series       = {Multiple Sclerosis},
  title        = {Cognitive dysfunction 24-31 years after isolated optic neuritis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1352458508090669},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2008},
}