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Optimizing the mapping of finger areas in primary somatosensory cortex using functional MRI.

Weibull, Andreas LU ; Björkman, Anders LU ; Hall, Henrik; Rosén, Birgitta LU ; Lundborg, Göran LU and Svensson, Jonas LU (2008) In Magnetic Resonance Imaging Jun 10. p.1342-1351
Abstract
Functional magnetic resonance imaging mapping of the finger somatotopy in the primary somatosensory cortex requires a reproducible and precise stimulation. The highly detailed functional architecture in this region of the brain also requires careful consideration in choice of spatial resolution and postprocessing parameters. The purpose of this study is therefore to investigate the impact of spatial resolution and level of smoothing during tactile stimulation using a precise stimuli system. Twenty-one volunteers were scanned using 2(3) mm(3) and 3(3) mm(3) voxel volume and subsequently evaluated using three different smoothing kernel widths. The overall activation reproducibility was also evaluated. Using a high spatial resolution proved... (More)
Functional magnetic resonance imaging mapping of the finger somatotopy in the primary somatosensory cortex requires a reproducible and precise stimulation. The highly detailed functional architecture in this region of the brain also requires careful consideration in choice of spatial resolution and postprocessing parameters. The purpose of this study is therefore to investigate the impact of spatial resolution and level of smoothing during tactile stimulation using a precise stimuli system. Twenty-one volunteers were scanned using 2(3) mm(3) and 3(3) mm(3) voxel volume and subsequently evaluated using three different smoothing kernel widths. The overall activation reproducibility was also evaluated. Using a high spatial resolution proved advantageous for all fingers. At 2(3) mm(3) voxel volume, activation of the thumb, middle finger and little finger areas was seen in 89%, 67% and 50% of the volunteers, compared to 78%, 61% and 33% at 3(3) mm(3), respectively. The sensitivity was comparable for nonsmoothed and slightly smoothed (4 mm kernel width) data; however, increasing the smoothing kernel width from 4 to 8 mm resulted in a critical decrease ( approximately 50%) in sensitivity. In repeated measurements of the same subject at six different days, the localization reproducibility of all fingers was within 4 mm (1 S.D. of the mean). The precise computer-controlled stimulus, together with data acquisition at high spatial resolution and with only minor smoothing during evaluation, could be a very useful strategy in studies of brain plasticity and rehabilitation strategies in hand and finger disorders and injuries. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
volume
Jun 10
pages
1342 - 1351
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000261444500003
  • pmid:18550314
  • scopus:55949113827
ISSN
1873-5894
DOI
10.1016/j.mri.2008.04.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
430a3f01-8d73-42a6-a78f-126def064f39 (old id 1168864)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18550314?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 13:15:55
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:37:43
@article{430a3f01-8d73-42a6-a78f-126def064f39,
  abstract     = {Functional magnetic resonance imaging mapping of the finger somatotopy in the primary somatosensory cortex requires a reproducible and precise stimulation. The highly detailed functional architecture in this region of the brain also requires careful consideration in choice of spatial resolution and postprocessing parameters. The purpose of this study is therefore to investigate the impact of spatial resolution and level of smoothing during tactile stimulation using a precise stimuli system. Twenty-one volunteers were scanned using 2(3) mm(3) and 3(3) mm(3) voxel volume and subsequently evaluated using three different smoothing kernel widths. The overall activation reproducibility was also evaluated. Using a high spatial resolution proved advantageous for all fingers. At 2(3) mm(3) voxel volume, activation of the thumb, middle finger and little finger areas was seen in 89%, 67% and 50% of the volunteers, compared to 78%, 61% and 33% at 3(3) mm(3), respectively. The sensitivity was comparable for nonsmoothed and slightly smoothed (4 mm kernel width) data; however, increasing the smoothing kernel width from 4 to 8 mm resulted in a critical decrease ( approximately 50%) in sensitivity. In repeated measurements of the same subject at six different days, the localization reproducibility of all fingers was within 4 mm (1 S.D. of the mean). The precise computer-controlled stimulus, together with data acquisition at high spatial resolution and with only minor smoothing during evaluation, could be a very useful strategy in studies of brain plasticity and rehabilitation strategies in hand and finger disorders and injuries.},
  author       = {Weibull, Andreas and Björkman, Anders and Hall, Henrik and Rosén, Birgitta and Lundborg, Göran and Svensson, Jonas},
  issn         = {1873-5894},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1342--1351},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
  title        = {Optimizing the mapping of finger areas in primary somatosensory cortex using functional MRI.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2008.04.007},
  volume       = {Jun 10},
  year         = {2008},
}