Advanced

Patients consulting with students in general practice: Survey of patients' satisfaction and their role in teaching.

Haffling, Ann-Christin LU and Håkansson, Anders LU (2008) In Medical Teacher 30(6). p.622-629
Abstract
Background: General practice is a common setting for medical students' clinical training. However, little is known about patients' views on consulting with senior students. Aims: To investigate patients' attitudes to consultations conducted by senior students alone, before patients saw their GP; and to enquire into patients' perception of their teaching role. Method: Adult patients attending 50 health centres in Sweden completed a questionnaire directly after their consultation with a fifth-year medical student and their GP. Results were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 495 patients, and 92% were satisfied with their consultation. Reasons were personal gain as well as altruism. Almost... (More)
Background: General practice is a common setting for medical students' clinical training. However, little is known about patients' views on consulting with senior students. Aims: To investigate patients' attitudes to consultations conducted by senior students alone, before patients saw their GP; and to enquire into patients' perception of their teaching role. Method: Adult patients attending 50 health centres in Sweden completed a questionnaire directly after their consultation with a fifth-year medical student and their GP. Results were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 495 patients, and 92% were satisfied with their consultation. Reasons were personal gain as well as altruism. Almost all patients were prepared to consult with a student again, however in a third of cases conditional on the nature of their presenting complaints. Emotional problems and intimate examinations could cause reluctance. Patients' conception of their teaching role supported previous research: patients as "facilitators of students" development of professional skills and as "experts" or "exemplars" of their condition. An additional theme, patients as "part of a real context", emerged. Conclusions: Patients in general practice have a positive view towards consulting with senior students. Even unprepared patients see themselves as contributors to teaching, and their capacity in this respect is probably under-utilized. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
SoTL
categories
Higher Education
in
Medical Teacher
volume
30
issue
6
pages
622 - 629
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000258133100008
  • pmid:18608965
  • scopus:48749093157
ISSN
0142-159X
DOI
10.1080/01421590802043827
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
25473ea8-a8ef-4d7d-97e2-43842cb4ebc8 (old id 1181438)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18608965?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-08-07 09:23:48
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:53:07
@article{25473ea8-a8ef-4d7d-97e2-43842cb4ebc8,
  abstract     = {Background: General practice is a common setting for medical students' clinical training. However, little is known about patients' views on consulting with senior students. Aims: To investigate patients' attitudes to consultations conducted by senior students alone, before patients saw their GP; and to enquire into patients' perception of their teaching role. Method: Adult patients attending 50 health centres in Sweden completed a questionnaire directly after their consultation with a fifth-year medical student and their GP. Results were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 495 patients, and 92% were satisfied with their consultation. Reasons were personal gain as well as altruism. Almost all patients were prepared to consult with a student again, however in a third of cases conditional on the nature of their presenting complaints. Emotional problems and intimate examinations could cause reluctance. Patients' conception of their teaching role supported previous research: patients as "facilitators of students" development of professional skills and as "experts" or "exemplars" of their condition. An additional theme, patients as "part of a real context", emerged. Conclusions: Patients in general practice have a positive view towards consulting with senior students. Even unprepared patients see themselves as contributors to teaching, and their capacity in this respect is probably under-utilized.},
  author       = {Haffling, Ann-Christin and Håkansson, Anders},
  issn         = {0142-159X},
  keyword      = {SoTL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {622--629},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Medical Teacher},
  title        = {Patients consulting with students in general practice: Survey of patients' satisfaction and their role in teaching.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01421590802043827},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2008},
}