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Responses of plant cells and tissues to pulsed electric field treatments

Galindo, Federico Gómez LU (2017) 4. p.2621-2635
Abstract

Cell membrane electroporation/permeabilization may be achieved without affecting cell viability through strict control of the electric pulse parameters. This process is referred to as reversible permeabilization. Even if the cells survive the electric field treatment, they are subjected to stress due to the opening of pores and the struggle of the cells to recover their normal functionality. Very little is known about what actually occurs in the cell and its membranes at the molecular level upon reversible electroporation, and the physiological responses to pulsed electric field (PEF)-induced stress are still largely unknown. This chapter explores the current state of the art on the influence of the complexity of plant tissues on... (More)

Cell membrane electroporation/permeabilization may be achieved without affecting cell viability through strict control of the electric pulse parameters. This process is referred to as reversible permeabilization. Even if the cells survive the electric field treatment, they are subjected to stress due to the opening of pores and the struggle of the cells to recover their normal functionality. Very little is known about what actually occurs in the cell and its membranes at the molecular level upon reversible electroporation, and the physiological responses to pulsed electric field (PEF)-induced stress are still largely unknown. This chapter explores the current state of the art on the influence of the complexity of plant tissues on electroporation. Focusing on reversible electroporation, metabolic responses of plant cells and tissues induced by PEF application are also reviewed. One of the first challenges when electroporating plant tissue is their heterogeneous structures where cells vary in shape, size, and cell wall structure. This heterogeneity influences the effect of different electric fields protocols aiming at permeabilizing all cells in the tissue. Once cells are reversibly permeabilized, physiological responses to PEF-induced stress include the production of reactive oxygen species, mobilization of stored energy, activation of stress-related genes, and the production of secondary metabolites. The application of reversible PEF has also been shown to barley seed germination as well as to increase the strength of the cell wall in potatoes and, in consequence, their textural properties. This chapter finishes by revising the effect of reversible PEF on protoplasts (plant cells where the cell walls have been removed) and, in consequence, on the regeneration of new plants. Overall, reports on reversible permeabilization of plant cells and tissues are not common in the literature; however, they have laid the foundation for a fascinating area of research and technological innovation.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cell wall, Germination, Metabolic responses, Metabolites, Protoplasts, Pulse conditions, Recovery, Reversible electroporation, Tissue structure
host publication
Handbook of Electroporation
volume
4
pages
15 pages
publisher
Springer International Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044095836
ISBN
9783319328850
9783319328867
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-32886-7_195
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
11d4835f-3235-4d05-b0c8-b1524cd66289
date added to LUP
2018-04-09 14:48:10
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:13:18
@inbook{11d4835f-3235-4d05-b0c8-b1524cd66289,
  abstract     = {<p>Cell membrane electroporation/permeabilization may be achieved without affecting cell viability through strict control of the electric pulse parameters. This process is referred to as reversible permeabilization. Even if the cells survive the electric field treatment, they are subjected to stress due to the opening of pores and the struggle of the cells to recover their normal functionality. Very little is known about what actually occurs in the cell and its membranes at the molecular level upon reversible electroporation, and the physiological responses to pulsed electric field (PEF)-induced stress are still largely unknown. This chapter explores the current state of the art on the influence of the complexity of plant tissues on electroporation. Focusing on reversible electroporation, metabolic responses of plant cells and tissues induced by PEF application are also reviewed. One of the first challenges when electroporating plant tissue is their heterogeneous structures where cells vary in shape, size, and cell wall structure. This heterogeneity influences the effect of different electric fields protocols aiming at permeabilizing all cells in the tissue. Once cells are reversibly permeabilized, physiological responses to PEF-induced stress include the production of reactive oxygen species, mobilization of stored energy, activation of stress-related genes, and the production of secondary metabolites. The application of reversible PEF has also been shown to barley seed germination as well as to increase the strength of the cell wall in potatoes and, in consequence, their textural properties. This chapter finishes by revising the effect of reversible PEF on protoplasts (plant cells where the cell walls have been removed) and, in consequence, on the regeneration of new plants. Overall, reports on reversible permeabilization of plant cells and tissues are not common in the literature; however, they have laid the foundation for a fascinating area of research and technological innovation.</p>},
  author       = {Galindo, Federico Gómez},
  isbn         = {9783319328850},
  keyword      = {Cell wall,Germination,Metabolic responses,Metabolites,Protoplasts,Pulse conditions,Recovery,Reversible electroporation,Tissue structure},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {2621--2635},
  publisher    = {Springer International Publishing},
  title        = {Responses of plant cells and tissues to pulsed electric field treatments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32886-7_195},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2017},
}