Advanced

Tuning in to multiple predators: conflicting demands for shell morphology in a freshwater snail.

Lakowitz, Thomas LU ; Brönmark, Christer LU and Nyström, Per LU (2008) In Freshwater Biology 53(11). p.2184-2191
Abstract
1. We examined the response to chemical cues from fish and crayfish, two predators with contrasting feeding modes, and their single and combined effect on shell morphology in the freshwater snail Radix balthica.

2. Snails were subjected to four treatments: tench (Tinca tinca), signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), a combination of tench and signal crayfish and no predators (control). Shell shape, crushing resistance and shell thickness were quantified. We also analyzed whether shape or shell thickness contributes most to crushing resistance.

3. Chemical cues from the fish induced a rounder shell shape in R. balthica, a thicker shell and a higher crushing resistance, whereas crayfish chemical cues had no effect on... (More)
1. We examined the response to chemical cues from fish and crayfish, two predators with contrasting feeding modes, and their single and combined effect on shell morphology in the freshwater snail Radix balthica.

2. Snails were subjected to four treatments: tench (Tinca tinca), signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), a combination of tench and signal crayfish and no predators (control). Shell shape, crushing resistance and shell thickness were quantified. We also analyzed whether shape or shell thickness contributes most to crushing resistance.

3. Chemical cues from the fish induced a rounder shell shape in R. balthica, a thicker shell and a higher crushing resistance, whereas crayfish chemical cues had no effect on shell morphology, shell thickness or crushing resistance. Shell shape contributed more to crushing resistance than shell thickness.

4. The combined predator treatment showed an intermediate response between the fish and crayfish treatments. Shell roundness was reduced compared to the fish treatment, but the reduced crushing resistance that comes with a less rounded shell was compensated by an increased investment in extra shell material, exceeding that of the fish treatment.

5. Our study extends previous studies of multipredator effects on phenotypically plastic freshwater snails by showing that the snails are able to fine tune different elements of morphology to counter predator specific foraging modes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Radix balthica, phenotypic plasticity, inducible defence, complementary traits, chemical cues
in
Freshwater Biology
volume
53
issue
11
pages
2184 - 2191
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000262283200005
  • scopus:53249130867
ISSN
0046-5070
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2427.2008.02045.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1760302b-0900-4335-bae2-ae8674d4de14 (old id 1242566)
date added to LUP
2008-11-27 14:19:50
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:50:56
@article{1760302b-0900-4335-bae2-ae8674d4de14,
  abstract     = {1. We examined the response to chemical cues from fish and crayfish, two predators with contrasting feeding modes, and their single and combined effect on shell morphology in the freshwater snail Radix balthica. <br/><br>
2. Snails were subjected to four treatments: tench (Tinca tinca), signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), a combination of tench and signal crayfish and no predators (control). Shell shape, crushing resistance and shell thickness were quantified. We also analyzed whether shape or shell thickness contributes most to crushing resistance.<br/><br>
3. Chemical cues from the fish induced a rounder shell shape in R. balthica, a thicker shell and a higher crushing resistance, whereas crayfish chemical cues had no effect on shell morphology, shell thickness or crushing resistance. Shell shape contributed more to crushing resistance than shell thickness.<br/><br>
4. The combined predator treatment showed an intermediate response between the fish and crayfish treatments. Shell roundness was reduced compared to the fish treatment, but the reduced crushing resistance that comes with a less rounded shell was compensated by an increased investment in extra shell material, exceeding that of the fish treatment.<br/><br>
5. Our study extends previous studies of multipredator effects on phenotypically plastic freshwater snails by showing that the snails are able to fine tune different elements of morphology to counter predator specific foraging modes.},
  author       = {Lakowitz, Thomas and Brönmark, Christer and Nyström, Per},
  issn         = {0046-5070},
  keyword      = {Radix balthica,phenotypic plasticity,inducible defence,complementary traits,chemical cues},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2184--2191},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Freshwater Biology},
  title        = {Tuning in to multiple predators: conflicting demands for shell morphology in a freshwater snail.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2427.2008.02045.x},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2008},
}