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Quality of life in old people with and without cancer.

Thomé, Bibbi LU ; Dykes, Anna-Karin LU and Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill LU (2004) In Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation 13(6). p.1067-1080
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the influence of age and gender on quality of life (QoL), complaints, and the presence and nature of self-reported diseases in persons aged 75 and older with cancer (n = 150), compared to a matched group without cancer (n = 138). A second aim was to investigate factors associated with poor QoL in people aged 75 and older. QoL was measured with Short Form (SF-12) and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-30). The study showed that the cancer group had lower (poorer) scores in different domains of QoL, more complaints, and more self-reported diseases than the group without cancer. In both groups, oldest old persons had more complaints than the youngest... (More)
The aim was to investigate the influence of age and gender on quality of life (QoL), complaints, and the presence and nature of self-reported diseases in persons aged 75 and older with cancer (n = 150), compared to a matched group without cancer (n = 138). A second aim was to investigate factors associated with poor QoL in people aged 75 and older. QoL was measured with Short Form (SF-12) and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-30). The study showed that the cancer group had lower (poorer) scores in different domains of QoL, more complaints, and more self-reported diseases than the group without cancer. In both groups, oldest old persons had more complaints than the youngest old. The cancer group had significantly more complaints than the noncancer group. In the youngest old, the cancer group had significantly more complaints than the comparison group. Women with cancer reported the poorest QoL compared to men with cancer and women without cancer. Receiving help for daily living from others and degree of complaints were associated with poor QoL for both the physical and mental component scores (PCS, MCS) of the SF-12. Thus, caregivers should be aware that the most vulnerable cancer patients are women, and that the complaints by cancer patients have implications for QoL especially among the youngest old. (Less)
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published
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keywords
Matched-Pair Analysis, Male, Non-U.S. Gov't, Sweden: epidemiology, 80 and over, Case-Control Studies, Comorbidity, Female, Human, Nonparametric, Support, Neoplasms: complications, Neoplasms: physiopathology, Neoplasms: psychology, Quality of Life, Sex Factors, Sickness Impact Profile, Socioeconomic Factors, Statistics, Activities of Daily Living, Age Factors, Aged
in
Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation
volume
13
issue
6
pages
1067 - 1080
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:15287273
  • wos:000221938300004
  • scopus:2642521579
ISSN
1573-2649
DOI
10.1023/B:QURE.0000031342.11869.2f
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
79cf4895-6144-4e29-81fd-98191ce3d7f9 (old id 126976)
date added to LUP
2007-07-23 16:52:55
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:09:20
@article{79cf4895-6144-4e29-81fd-98191ce3d7f9,
  abstract     = {The aim was to investigate the influence of age and gender on quality of life (QoL), complaints, and the presence and nature of self-reported diseases in persons aged 75 and older with cancer (n = 150), compared to a matched group without cancer (n = 138). A second aim was to investigate factors associated with poor QoL in people aged 75 and older. QoL was measured with Short Form (SF-12) and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-30). The study showed that the cancer group had lower (poorer) scores in different domains of QoL, more complaints, and more self-reported diseases than the group without cancer. In both groups, oldest old persons had more complaints than the youngest old. The cancer group had significantly more complaints than the noncancer group. In the youngest old, the cancer group had significantly more complaints than the comparison group. Women with cancer reported the poorest QoL compared to men with cancer and women without cancer. Receiving help for daily living from others and degree of complaints were associated with poor QoL for both the physical and mental component scores (PCS, MCS) of the SF-12. Thus, caregivers should be aware that the most vulnerable cancer patients are women, and that the complaints by cancer patients have implications for QoL especially among the youngest old.},
  author       = {Thomé, Bibbi and Dykes, Anna-Karin and Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill},
  issn         = {1573-2649},
  keyword      = {Matched-Pair Analysis,Male,Non-U.S. Gov't,Sweden: epidemiology,80 and over,Case-Control Studies,Comorbidity,Female,Human,Nonparametric,Support,Neoplasms: complications,Neoplasms: physiopathology,Neoplasms: psychology,Quality of Life,Sex Factors,Sickness Impact Profile,Socioeconomic Factors,Statistics,Activities of Daily Living,Age Factors,Aged},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1067--1080},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation},
  title        = {Quality of life in old people with and without cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:QURE.0000031342.11869.2f},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2004},
}