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Jane Eyre and the Genre of "Governess Novels"

Wadsö-Lecaros, Cecilia LU (2008) In Jane Eyre: De Charlotte Brontë à Franco Zeffirelli p.33-45
Abstract
Jane Eyre is perhaps the best known governess charatcer in nineteenth-century fiction, but as this article shows, Charlotte Brontë's heroine differs radically from the common depiction of governesses at the time. After an outline of the genre characteristics of the governess novel this article offers a close reading of some scenes in Jane Eyre in order to establish to what extent the novel can be seen as a governess novel and in what ways – and to what effect – it deviates from this genre. In some aspects, such as Jane’s background and education, as well as the element of personal development, the novel adheres closely to the genre characteristics. However, in certain scenes connected to Jane’s governess experience, Brontë inverts these... (More)
Jane Eyre is perhaps the best known governess charatcer in nineteenth-century fiction, but as this article shows, Charlotte Brontë's heroine differs radically from the common depiction of governesses at the time. After an outline of the genre characteristics of the governess novel this article offers a close reading of some scenes in Jane Eyre in order to establish to what extent the novel can be seen as a governess novel and in what ways – and to what effect – it deviates from this genre. In some aspects, such as Jane’s background and education, as well as the element of personal development, the novel adheres closely to the genre characteristics. However, in certain scenes connected to Jane’s governess experience, Brontë inverts these genre conventions, thereby indicating to the contemporary reader – who could be expected to be familiar with the genre conventions – that things are deceptive at Thornfield. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Jane Eyre, governess novel, Nineteenth-century fiction, Charlotte Brontë
in
Jane Eyre: De Charlotte Brontë à Franco Zeffirelli
editor
Regard, Frédéric and Trapenard, Augustin
pages
33 - 45
publisher
Éditions Sedes
ISBN
978-2-301-00040-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b0ca025-5244-48f1-a676-077ecde734bc (old id 1273079)
date added to LUP
2008-12-10 11:28:04
date last changed
2016-12-15 14:45:42
@inbook{1b0ca025-5244-48f1-a676-077ecde734bc,
  abstract     = {Jane Eyre is perhaps the best known governess charatcer in nineteenth-century fiction, but as this article shows, Charlotte Brontë's heroine differs radically from the common depiction of governesses at the time. After an outline of the genre characteristics of the governess novel this article offers a close reading of some scenes in Jane Eyre in order to establish to what extent the novel can be seen as a governess novel and in what ways – and to what effect – it deviates from this genre. In some aspects, such as Jane’s background and education, as well as the element of personal development, the novel adheres closely to the genre characteristics. However, in certain scenes connected to Jane’s governess experience, Brontë inverts these genre conventions, thereby indicating to the contemporary reader – who could be expected to be familiar with the genre conventions – that things are deceptive at Thornfield.},
  author       = {Wadsö-Lecaros, Cecilia},
  editor       = {Regard, Frédéric and Trapenard, Augustin},
  isbn         = {978-2-301-00040-8},
  keyword      = {Jane Eyre,governess novel,Nineteenth-century fiction,Charlotte Brontë},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {33--45},
  publisher    = {Éditions Sedes},
  series       = {Jane Eyre: De Charlotte Brontë à Franco Zeffirelli},
  title        = {Jane Eyre and the Genre of "Governess Novels"},
  year         = {2008},
}