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Psychosocial work conditions, social capital, and daily smoking: a population based study.

Lindström, Martin LU (2004) In Tobacco Control 13(3). p.289-295
Abstract
Objective: To investigate the associations between psychosocial conditions at work, social capital/social participation, and daily smoking.

Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross sectional postal questionnaire study with a 59% participation rate. A total of 5180 persons aged 18–64 years that belonged to the work force and the unemployed were included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between psychosocial factors at work/unemployment, social participation, and daily smoking. Psychosocial conditions at work were defined according to the Karasek-Theorell demand–control/decision latitudes into relaxed, active, passive, and... (More)
Objective: To investigate the associations between psychosocial conditions at work, social capital/social participation, and daily smoking.

Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross sectional postal questionnaire study with a 59% participation rate. A total of 5180 persons aged 18–64 years that belonged to the work force and the unemployed were included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between psychosocial factors at work/unemployment, social participation, and daily smoking. Psychosocial conditions at work were defined according to the Karasek-Theorell demand–control/decision latitudes into relaxed, active, passive, and jobstrain categories. The multivariate analyses included age, country of origin, education and economic stress.

Results: 17.2% proportion of all men and 21.9% of all women were daily smokers. The jobstrain (high demands/low control) and unemployed categories had significantly higher odds ratios of daily smoking among both men and women compared to the relaxed (low demands/high control) reference category. The passive (low demands/low control), jobstrain, and unemployed categories were also significantly associated with low social participation. Low social participation was significantly and positively associated with daily smoking within each of the psychosocial work conditions and unemployed categories.

Conclusions: The positive association between low social capital/low social participation and daily smoking is well known. However, both social participation and daily smoking are associated with psychosocial work conditions and unemployment. Psychosocial work conditions and unemployment may affect daily smoking both directly and through a pathway including social participation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
social participation, social capital, psychosocial conditions at work, daily smoking
in
Tobacco Control
volume
13
issue
3
pages
289 - 295
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:15333886
  • wos:000223532700023
  • scopus:7544235869
ISSN
1468-3318
DOI
10.1136/tc.2003.007138
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c5ba91b4-9e29-4a9f-a6bd-8997c69f2b41 (old id 127728)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 14:17:53
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:28:37
@article{c5ba91b4-9e29-4a9f-a6bd-8997c69f2b41,
  abstract     = {Objective: To investigate the associations between psychosocial conditions at work, social capital/social participation, and daily smoking. <br/><br>
Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross sectional postal questionnaire study with a 59% participation rate. A total of 5180 persons aged 18–64 years that belonged to the work force and the unemployed were included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between psychosocial factors at work/unemployment, social participation, and daily smoking. Psychosocial conditions at work were defined according to the Karasek-Theorell demand–control/decision latitudes into relaxed, active, passive, and jobstrain categories. The multivariate analyses included age, country of origin, education and economic stress. <br/><br>
Results: 17.2% proportion of all men and 21.9% of all women were daily smokers. The jobstrain (high demands/low control) and unemployed categories had significantly higher odds ratios of daily smoking among both men and women compared to the relaxed (low demands/high control) reference category. The passive (low demands/low control), jobstrain, and unemployed categories were also significantly associated with low social participation. Low social participation was significantly and positively associated with daily smoking within each of the psychosocial work conditions and unemployed categories. <br/><br>
Conclusions: The positive association between low social capital/low social participation and daily smoking is well known. However, both social participation and daily smoking are associated with psychosocial work conditions and unemployment. Psychosocial work conditions and unemployment may affect daily smoking both directly and through a pathway including social participation.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1468-3318},
  keyword      = {social participation,social capital,psychosocial conditions at work,daily smoking},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {289--295},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Tobacco Control},
  title        = {Psychosocial work conditions, social capital, and daily smoking: a population based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/tc.2003.007138},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2004},
}