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Long-Term Survival and Fracture Risk After Hip Fracture: A 22-Year Follow-Up in Women

von Friesendorff, My LU ; Besjakov, Jack LU and Åkesson, Kristina LU (2008) In Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 23(11). p.1832-1841
Abstract
Hip fracture is associated with high early mortality. Little is known about long-term survival and subsequent fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate survival and fracture risk after hip fracture in women at different ages. All women suffering a hip fracture during 1984-1985 in Malmo, Sweden, were identified (n = 766) and followd up to 22 yr or death. All new radiographic examinations related to musculoskeletal trauma with or without fracture were registered. Survival (mortality) and fracture was evaluated in 5-yr age bands and in age groups(<75, 75-84, and >= 85 yr). Mean age was 79.6 +/- 9.9 yr (range, 31.6-99.4 yr), with 42% between 75 and 85 yr of age. Overall 22-yr survival was 6%; 79% at 1 yr, 48% at 5 yr, and 33%... (More)
Hip fracture is associated with high early mortality. Little is known about long-term survival and subsequent fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate survival and fracture risk after hip fracture in women at different ages. All women suffering a hip fracture during 1984-1985 in Malmo, Sweden, were identified (n = 766) and followd up to 22 yr or death. All new radiographic examinations related to musculoskeletal trauma with or without fracture were registered. Survival (mortality) and fracture was evaluated in 5-yr age bands and in age groups(<75, 75-84, and >= 85 yr). Mean age was 79.6 +/- 9.9 yr (range, 31.6-99.4 yr), with 42% between 75 and 85 yr of age. Overall 22-yr survival was 6%; 79% at 1 yr, 48% at 5 yr, and 33% at 10 yr (i.e., population at risk). One-year mortality was 7%, 21%, and 33% for <75, 75-84, and >= 85 yr of age, respectively, and 95% of those >= 85 yr were dead at 10 yr. Prior hip fracture did not affect age-adjusted mortality (OR1.05; 95% CI, 0.756-1.20; p = 0.15). A total of 768 fractures were registered at 715 occasions in 342 women (45%; mean, 2.3 fractures/woman; range, 1-11 fractures/woman). Of the fracture occasions, 1.5% occurred within the first year. 27% within 2 yr, and 73% within 5 yr. The residual lifetime fracture risk was 45%, with a mortality-adjusted increase to 86%. The 10-yr fracture risk was 40% with a mortality-adjusted increased to 65%. In conclusion, almost one half of all women with a hip fracture suffer a new fracture during their remaining lifetime. Fracture risk is highly dependent on age and survival, emphasizing that preventive strategies need to he tailored to each age group specifically. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
residual lifetime, mortality, hip fracture, epidemiology, fracture risk, risk, survival
in
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
volume
23
issue
11
pages
1832 - 1841
publisher
AMBMR
external identifiers
  • wos:000260195900014
  • scopus:54249097380
ISSN
1523-4681
DOI
10.1359/JBMR.080606
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7b6a829e-25fc-4c06-9a33-13b60382edb5 (old id 1284646)
date added to LUP
2009-02-09 09:52:27
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:41:25
@article{7b6a829e-25fc-4c06-9a33-13b60382edb5,
  abstract     = {Hip fracture is associated with high early mortality. Little is known about long-term survival and subsequent fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate survival and fracture risk after hip fracture in women at different ages. All women suffering a hip fracture during 1984-1985 in Malmo, Sweden, were identified (n = 766) and followd up to 22 yr or death. All new radiographic examinations related to musculoskeletal trauma with or without fracture were registered. Survival (mortality) and fracture was evaluated in 5-yr age bands and in age groups(&lt;75, 75-84, and &gt;= 85 yr). Mean age was 79.6 +/- 9.9 yr (range, 31.6-99.4 yr), with 42% between 75 and 85 yr of age. Overall 22-yr survival was 6%; 79% at 1 yr, 48% at 5 yr, and 33% at 10 yr (i.e., population at risk). One-year mortality was 7%, 21%, and 33% for &lt;75, 75-84, and &gt;= 85 yr of age, respectively, and 95% of those &gt;= 85 yr were dead at 10 yr. Prior hip fracture did not affect age-adjusted mortality (OR1.05; 95% CI, 0.756-1.20; p = 0.15). A total of 768 fractures were registered at 715 occasions in 342 women (45%; mean, 2.3 fractures/woman; range, 1-11 fractures/woman). Of the fracture occasions, 1.5% occurred within the first year. 27% within 2 yr, and 73% within 5 yr. The residual lifetime fracture risk was 45%, with a mortality-adjusted increase to 86%. The 10-yr fracture risk was 40% with a mortality-adjusted increased to 65%. In conclusion, almost one half of all women with a hip fracture suffer a new fracture during their remaining lifetime. Fracture risk is highly dependent on age and survival, emphasizing that preventive strategies need to he tailored to each age group specifically.},
  author       = {von Friesendorff, My and Besjakov, Jack and Åkesson, Kristina},
  issn         = {1523-4681},
  keyword      = {residual lifetime,mortality,hip fracture,epidemiology,fracture risk,risk,survival},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1832--1841},
  publisher    = {AMBMR},
  series       = {Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  title        = {Long-Term Survival and Fracture Risk After Hip Fracture: A 22-Year Follow-Up in Women},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.080606},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2008},
}