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Better knowledger improves adherence to lifestyle changes and medication in patients with coronary heart disease.

Alm, Carin LU ; Stagmo, Martin LU ; Udén, Giggi and Erhardt, Leif RW LU (2004) In European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing 3(4). p.321-330
Abstract
Background: Many patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not managed adequately, and we often fail to reach treatment targets. Aim: To investigate if knowledge of risk factors for CHD, measured by a questionnaire, would show any relation to advice to compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. Method: Men and women <71 years who had had a cardiac event were screened consecutively (509) from the medical records. Responders (392) were interviewed, examined and received a questionnaire. Three hundred and forty-seven patients answered the questionnaire regarding their general knowledge of risk factors for CHD, compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug... (More)
Background: Many patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not managed adequately, and we often fail to reach treatment targets. Aim: To investigate if knowledge of risk factors for CHD, measured by a questionnaire, would show any relation to advice to compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. Method: Men and women <71 years who had had a cardiac event were screened consecutively (509) from the medical records. Responders (392) were interviewed, examined and received a questionnaire. Three hundred and forty-seven patients answered the questionnaire regarding their general knowledge of risk factors for CHD, compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. Results: There were statistically significant correlations between general knowledge about risk factors for CHD and compliance to certain lifestyle changes: weight, physical activity, stress management, diet, attainment of lipid level goals and the likelihood of taking prescribed blood pressure-lowering drugs. General knowledge of risk factors had no correlation to blood glucose or blood pressure levels nor on smoking habits or treatment patterns for prescribed lipid- and blood glucose-lowering drugs. Conclusion: Knowledge correlates to patient behaviour with respect to some risk factors, which should be recognised in preventive programs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Coronary heart disease, Nursing, Compliance, Secondary prevention, Knowledge, Education
in
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
volume
3
issue
4
pages
321 - 330
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:9644276893
ISSN
1474-5151
DOI
10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2004.05.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6c2bc383-f383-4080-91ff-04af547ffeb9 (old id 132223)
date added to LUP
2008-06-12 12:08:00
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:39:45
@article{6c2bc383-f383-4080-91ff-04af547ffeb9,
  abstract     = {Background: Many patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not managed adequately, and we often fail to reach treatment targets. Aim: To investigate if knowledge of risk factors for CHD, measured by a questionnaire, would show any relation to advice to compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. Method: Men and women &lt;71 years who had had a cardiac event were screened consecutively (509) from the medical records. Responders (392) were interviewed, examined and received a questionnaire. Three hundred and forty-seven patients answered the questionnaire regarding their general knowledge of risk factors for CHD, compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. Results: There were statistically significant correlations between general knowledge about risk factors for CHD and compliance to certain lifestyle changes: weight, physical activity, stress management, diet, attainment of lipid level goals and the likelihood of taking prescribed blood pressure-lowering drugs. General knowledge of risk factors had no correlation to blood glucose or blood pressure levels nor on smoking habits or treatment patterns for prescribed lipid- and blood glucose-lowering drugs. Conclusion: Knowledge correlates to patient behaviour with respect to some risk factors, which should be recognised in preventive programs.},
  author       = {Alm, Carin and Stagmo, Martin and Udén, Giggi and Erhardt, Leif RW},
  issn         = {1474-5151},
  keyword      = {Coronary heart disease,Nursing,Compliance,Secondary prevention,Knowledge,Education},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {321--330},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing},
  title        = {Better knowledger improves adherence to lifestyle changes and medication in patients with coronary heart disease.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2004.05.002},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2004},
}