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Cancer risk in hospitalised asthma patients

Ji, J.; Shu, X.; Li, X.; Sundquist, K.; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, K. (2009) In British Journal of Cancer 100(5). p.829-833
Abstract
Asthma is an increasingly common disorder, affecting 5-10% of the population. It involves a dysregulated immune function, which may predispose to subsequent cancer. We examined cancer risk among Swedish subjects who had hospital admission once or multiple times for asthma. An asthma research database was created by identifying asthma patients from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and by linking them with the Cancer Registry. A total of 140 425 patients were hospitalised for asthma during 1965-2004, of whom 7421 patients developed cancer, giving an overall standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.36. A significant increase was noted for most sites, with the exception of breast and ovarian cancers and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and... (More)
Asthma is an increasingly common disorder, affecting 5-10% of the population. It involves a dysregulated immune function, which may predispose to subsequent cancer. We examined cancer risk among Swedish subjects who had hospital admission once or multiple times for asthma. An asthma research database was created by identifying asthma patients from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and by linking them with the Cancer Registry. A total of 140 425 patients were hospitalised for asthma during 1965-2004, of whom 7421 patients developed cancer, giving an overall standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.36. A significant increase was noted for most sites, with the exception of breast and ovarian cancers and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and myeloma. Patients with multiple hospital admissions showed a high risk, particularly for stomach (SIR 1.70) and colon (SIR 1.99) cancers. A significant decrease was noted for endometrial cancer and skin melanoma. Oesophageal and lung cancers showed high risks throughout the study period, whereas stomach cancer increased towards the end of the period. The relatively stable temporal trends suggest that the asthmatic condition rather than its medication is responsible for the observed associations. British Journal of Cancer (2009) 100, 829-833. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6604890 www.bjcancer.com Published online 27 January 2009 (C) 2009 Cancer Research UK (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
national databases, asthma, cancer risk
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
100
issue
5
pages
829 - 833
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000263905900025
  • scopus:61749092742
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6604890
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1d77a578-146e-47b6-9013-c275005e8783 (old id 1370759)
date added to LUP
2009-05-08 12:23:14
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:46:55
@article{1d77a578-146e-47b6-9013-c275005e8783,
  abstract     = {Asthma is an increasingly common disorder, affecting 5-10% of the population. It involves a dysregulated immune function, which may predispose to subsequent cancer. We examined cancer risk among Swedish subjects who had hospital admission once or multiple times for asthma. An asthma research database was created by identifying asthma patients from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and by linking them with the Cancer Registry. A total of 140 425 patients were hospitalised for asthma during 1965-2004, of whom 7421 patients developed cancer, giving an overall standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.36. A significant increase was noted for most sites, with the exception of breast and ovarian cancers and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and myeloma. Patients with multiple hospital admissions showed a high risk, particularly for stomach (SIR 1.70) and colon (SIR 1.99) cancers. A significant decrease was noted for endometrial cancer and skin melanoma. Oesophageal and lung cancers showed high risks throughout the study period, whereas stomach cancer increased towards the end of the period. The relatively stable temporal trends suggest that the asthmatic condition rather than its medication is responsible for the observed associations. British Journal of Cancer (2009) 100, 829-833. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6604890 www.bjcancer.com Published online 27 January 2009 (C) 2009 Cancer Research UK},
  author       = {Ji, J. and Shu, X. and Li, X. and Sundquist, K. and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, K.},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {national databases,asthma,cancer risk},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {829--833},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Cancer risk in hospitalised asthma patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604890},
  volume       = {100},
  year         = {2009},
}