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Dynamics of the caring family

Härdling, Roger LU ; Kokko, H and Arnold, KE (2003) In American Naturalist 161(3). p.395-412
Abstract
When several individuals simultaneously provide for offspring, as in families, the effort of any one individual will depend on the efforts of the other family members. This conflict of interest among family members is made more complicated by their relatedness because relatives share genetic interest to some degree. The conflict resolution will also be influenced by the differences in reproductive value between breeders and helpers. Here, we calculate evolutionarily stable provisioning efforts in families with up to two helpers. We explicitly consider that the behavioral choices are made in a life-history context, and we also consider how group sizes change dynamically; this affects, for example, average relatedness among group members. We... (More)
When several individuals simultaneously provide for offspring, as in families, the effort of any one individual will depend on the efforts of the other family members. This conflict of interest among family members is made more complicated by their relatedness because relatives share genetic interest to some degree. The conflict resolution will also be influenced by the differences in reproductive value between breeders and helpers. Here, we calculate evolutionarily stable provisioning efforts in families with up to two helpers. We explicitly consider that the behavioral choices are made in a life-history context, and we also consider how group sizes change dynamically; this affects, for example, average relatedness among group members. We assume two different scenarios: intact families in which the breeder is 100% monogamous and stepfamilies in which the breeder shifts mate between breeding events. The average relatedness among family members is allowed to evolve in concert with changes in provisioning effort. Our model shows that an individual's provisioning effort is not easy to predict from either its relatedness to the offspring or its reproductive value. Instead, it is necessary to consider the inclusive fitness effect of provisioning, which is determined by a combination of relatedness, reproductive value, and the reproductive value of the offspring. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
evolutionary conflict., ESS, family dynamics, load lightening, cooperative breeding, provisioning efforts
in
American Naturalist
volume
161
issue
3
pages
395 - 412
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000181612700004
  • pmid:12699220
  • scopus:0242668878
ISSN
0003-0147
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b171e3b7-75a3-45b1-8b46-5d239f0f2223 (old id 137352)
alternative location
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?index=1&did=333805451&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=6&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1210690240&clientId=53681
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 12:06:26
date last changed
2018-01-07 05:18:15
@article{b171e3b7-75a3-45b1-8b46-5d239f0f2223,
  abstract     = {When several individuals simultaneously provide for offspring, as in families, the effort of any one individual will depend on the efforts of the other family members. This conflict of interest among family members is made more complicated by their relatedness because relatives share genetic interest to some degree. The conflict resolution will also be influenced by the differences in reproductive value between breeders and helpers. Here, we calculate evolutionarily stable provisioning efforts in families with up to two helpers. We explicitly consider that the behavioral choices are made in a life-history context, and we also consider how group sizes change dynamically; this affects, for example, average relatedness among group members. We assume two different scenarios: intact families in which the breeder is 100% monogamous and stepfamilies in which the breeder shifts mate between breeding events. The average relatedness among family members is allowed to evolve in concert with changes in provisioning effort. Our model shows that an individual's provisioning effort is not easy to predict from either its relatedness to the offspring or its reproductive value. Instead, it is necessary to consider the inclusive fitness effect of provisioning, which is determined by a combination of relatedness, reproductive value, and the reproductive value of the offspring.},
  author       = {Härdling, Roger and Kokko, H and Arnold, KE},
  issn         = {0003-0147},
  keyword      = {evolutionary conflict.,ESS,family dynamics,load lightening,cooperative breeding,provisioning efforts},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {395--412},
  publisher    = {University of Chicago Press},
  series       = {American Naturalist},
  title        = {Dynamics of the caring family},
  volume       = {161},
  year         = {2003},
}