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Reduced training is associated with increased loss of BMD.

Valdimarsson, Örnolfur LU ; Alborg, Henrik G; Düppe, Henrik LU ; Nyquist, Fredrik and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2005) In Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 20(6). p.906-912
Abstract
This 8-year controlled, follow-up study in 66 Swedish soccer women evaluated the effect of training and reduced training on BMD. The players who retired during the follow-up lost BMD in the femoral neck, whereas the controls did not.



Introduction: Physical activity during adolescence increases BMD, but whether the benefits are retained with reduced activity is controversial.



Materials and Methods: At baseline, DXA evaluated BMD in 48 active female soccer players with a mean age of 18.2 ± 4.4 (SD) years, in 18 former female soccer players with a mean age of 43.2 ± 6.2 years and retired for a mean of 9.4 ± 5.3 years, and in 64 age- and sex-matched controls. The soccer women were remeasured after a mean... (More)
This 8-year controlled, follow-up study in 66 Swedish soccer women evaluated the effect of training and reduced training on BMD. The players who retired during the follow-up lost BMD in the femoral neck, whereas the controls did not.



Introduction: Physical activity during adolescence increases BMD, but whether the benefits are retained with reduced activity is controversial.



Materials and Methods: At baseline, DXA evaluated BMD in 48 active female soccer players with a mean age of 18.2 ± 4.4 (SD) years, in 18 former female soccer players with a mean age of 43.2 ± 6.2 years and retired for a mean of 9.4 ± 5.3 years, and in 64 age- and sex-matched controls. The soccer women were remeasured after a mean of 8.0 ± 0.3 years, when 35 of the players active at baseline had been retired for a mean of 5.3 ± 1.6 years.



Results and Conclusions: The players still active at follow-up had a higher BMD at baseline than the matched controls in the femoral neck (FN; 1.13 ± 0.19 versus 1.00 ± 0.13 g/cm2; p = 0.02). The yearly gain in BMD during follow-up was higher in the active players than in the controls in the leg (0.015 ± 0.006 versus 0.007 ± 0.012 g/cm2, p = 0.04). The soccer players who retired during follow-up had a higher BMD at baseline than the matched controls in the FN (1.13 ± 0.13 versus 1.04 ± 0.13 g/cm2; p = 0.005). The players that retired during follow-up lost BMD, whereas the controls gained BMD during the study period in the FN (−0.007 ± 0.01 versus 0.003 ± 0.02 g/cm2 yearly; p = 0.01). The soccer players already retired at baseline had higher BMD at study start than the matched controls in the leg (1.26 ± 0.09 versus 1.18 ± 0.10 g/cm2; p = 0.01). The former players who were retired at study start lost BMD, whereas the controls gained BMD during the study period in the trochanter (−0.006 ± 0.01 versus 0.004 ± 0.014 g/cm2 yearly; p = 0.01). This study shows that, in girls, intense exercise after puberty is associated with higher accrual of BMD, and decreased physical activity in both the short-term and long-term perspective is associated with higher BMD loss than in controls. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
volume
20
issue
6
pages
906 - 912
publisher
AMBMR
external identifiers
  • pmid:15883629
  • wos:000229297800003
  • scopus:19044399265
ISSN
1523-4681
DOI
10.1359/JBMR.050107
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ea0d41e4-0d54-4f07-89b6-be3057650301 (old id 138079)
date added to LUP
2007-07-30 13:08:38
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:48:06
@article{ea0d41e4-0d54-4f07-89b6-be3057650301,
  abstract     = {This 8-year controlled, follow-up study in 66 Swedish soccer women evaluated the effect of training and reduced training on BMD. The players who retired during the follow-up lost BMD in the femoral neck, whereas the controls did not.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Introduction: Physical activity during adolescence increases BMD, but whether the benefits are retained with reduced activity is controversial.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Materials and Methods: At baseline, DXA evaluated BMD in 48 active female soccer players with a mean age of 18.2 ± 4.4 (SD) years, in 18 former female soccer players with a mean age of 43.2 ± 6.2 years and retired for a mean of 9.4 ± 5.3 years, and in 64 age- and sex-matched controls. The soccer women were remeasured after a mean of 8.0 ± 0.3 years, when 35 of the players active at baseline had been retired for a mean of 5.3 ± 1.6 years.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results and Conclusions: The players still active at follow-up had a higher BMD at baseline than the matched controls in the femoral neck (FN; 1.13 ± 0.19 versus 1.00 ± 0.13 g/cm2; p = 0.02). The yearly gain in BMD during follow-up was higher in the active players than in the controls in the leg (0.015 ± 0.006 versus 0.007 ± 0.012 g/cm2, p = 0.04). The soccer players who retired during follow-up had a higher BMD at baseline than the matched controls in the FN (1.13 ± 0.13 versus 1.04 ± 0.13 g/cm2; p = 0.005). The players that retired during follow-up lost BMD, whereas the controls gained BMD during the study period in the FN (−0.007 ± 0.01 versus 0.003 ± 0.02 g/cm2 yearly; p = 0.01). The soccer players already retired at baseline had higher BMD at study start than the matched controls in the leg (1.26 ± 0.09 versus 1.18 ± 0.10 g/cm2; p = 0.01). The former players who were retired at study start lost BMD, whereas the controls gained BMD during the study period in the trochanter (−0.006 ± 0.01 versus 0.004 ± 0.014 g/cm2 yearly; p = 0.01). This study shows that, in girls, intense exercise after puberty is associated with higher accrual of BMD, and decreased physical activity in both the short-term and long-term perspective is associated with higher BMD loss than in controls.},
  author       = {Valdimarsson, Örnolfur and Alborg, Henrik G and Düppe, Henrik and Nyquist, Fredrik and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1523-4681},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {906--912},
  publisher    = {AMBMR},
  series       = {Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  title        = {Reduced training is associated with increased loss of BMD.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.050107},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2005},
}