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Estimating the Cost of Diabetes Mellitus-Related Events from Inpatient Admissions in Sweden Using Administrative Hospitalization Data

Gerdtham, Ulf LU ; Clarke, Philip; Hayes, Alison and Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia (2009) In PharmacoEconomics 27(1). p.81-90
Abstract
Background and aims: To estimate short- and long-term costs of inpatient hospitalization in Sweden for major diabetes mellitus-related events. Materials and methods: Costs were estimated using administrative hospital data from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, which is linked to the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Data were available for 179 749 patients with diabetes in Sweden from 1998 to 2003 (mean and median duration of 6 years' follow-up). Costing of inpatient admissions was based on Nordic diagnosis-related groups (NordDRG). Multiple regression analysis (linear and generalizing estimating equation models) was used to estimate inpatient care costs controlling for age, sex and co-morbidities. The data on... (More)
Background and aims: To estimate short- and long-term costs of inpatient hospitalization in Sweden for major diabetes mellitus-related events. Materials and methods: Costs were estimated using administrative hospital data from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, which is linked to the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Data were available for 179 749 patients with diabetes in Sweden from 1998 to 2003 (mean and median duration of 6 years' follow-up). Costing of inpatient admissions was based on Nordic diagnosis-related groups (NordDRG). Multiple regression analysis (linear and generalizing estimating equation models) was used to estimate inpatient care costs controlling for age, sex and co-morbidities. The data on hospitalizations were converted to costs (E) using 2003 exchange rates. Results: The average annual costs (linear model) associated with inpatient admissions for a 60-year-old male in the year the first event first occurred were as follows: (sic)6488 (95% CI 5034, 8354) for diabetic coma; (sic)6850 (95% CI 6514, 7204) for heart failure; (sic)7853 (95% CI 7559, 8144) for non-fatal stroke; (sic)8121 (95% CI 7104, 9128) for peripheral circulatory complications; (sic)8736 (95% CI 8474, 9001) for non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI); (sic) 10 360 (95% CI 10 085, 10 643) for ischaemic heart disease; (sic) 11411 (95% CI 10 298, 12 654) for renal failure; and (sic)14 949 (95% CI 13 849, 16 551) for amputation. On average, the costs were higher when co-morbidity was accounted for (e.g. MI with co-morbidity was twice as costly as MI alone). Conclusions: Average hospital inpatient costs associated with common diabetes-related events can be estimated using panel data regression methods. These could assist in modelling of long-term costs of diabetes and in evaluating the cost effectiveness of improving care. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PharmacoEconomics
volume
27
issue
1
pages
81 - 90
publisher
Adis International
external identifiers
  • wos:000264273000008
  • scopus:59049100524
ISSN
1179-2027
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f97ce583-62ce-4101-8f2e-5f91557532ef (old id 1404613)
date added to LUP
2009-06-15 09:45:27
date last changed
2017-05-21 04:01:12
@article{f97ce583-62ce-4101-8f2e-5f91557532ef,
  abstract     = {Background and aims: To estimate short- and long-term costs of inpatient hospitalization in Sweden for major diabetes mellitus-related events. Materials and methods: Costs were estimated using administrative hospital data from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, which is linked to the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Data were available for 179 749 patients with diabetes in Sweden from 1998 to 2003 (mean and median duration of 6 years' follow-up). Costing of inpatient admissions was based on Nordic diagnosis-related groups (NordDRG). Multiple regression analysis (linear and generalizing estimating equation models) was used to estimate inpatient care costs controlling for age, sex and co-morbidities. The data on hospitalizations were converted to costs (E) using 2003 exchange rates. Results: The average annual costs (linear model) associated with inpatient admissions for a 60-year-old male in the year the first event first occurred were as follows: (sic)6488 (95% CI 5034, 8354) for diabetic coma; (sic)6850 (95% CI 6514, 7204) for heart failure; (sic)7853 (95% CI 7559, 8144) for non-fatal stroke; (sic)8121 (95% CI 7104, 9128) for peripheral circulatory complications; (sic)8736 (95% CI 8474, 9001) for non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI); (sic) 10 360 (95% CI 10 085, 10 643) for ischaemic heart disease; (sic) 11411 (95% CI 10 298, 12 654) for renal failure; and (sic)14 949 (95% CI 13 849, 16 551) for amputation. On average, the costs were higher when co-morbidity was accounted for (e.g. MI with co-morbidity was twice as costly as MI alone). Conclusions: Average hospital inpatient costs associated with common diabetes-related events can be estimated using panel data regression methods. These could assist in modelling of long-term costs of diabetes and in evaluating the cost effectiveness of improving care.},
  author       = {Gerdtham, Ulf and Clarke, Philip and Hayes, Alison and Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia},
  issn         = {1179-2027},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {81--90},
  publisher    = {Adis International},
  series       = {PharmacoEconomics},
  title        = {Estimating the Cost of Diabetes Mellitus-Related Events from Inpatient Admissions in Sweden Using Administrative Hospitalization Data},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2009},
}