Advanced

Cost effectiveness of haemophilia treatment: a cross-national assessment.

Lippert, Barbara; Berger, Karin; Berntorp, Erik LU ; Giangrande, Paul; van den Berg, Marijke; Schramm, Wolfgang and Siebert, Uwe (2005) In Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis 16(7). p.477-485
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the incremental cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic haemophilia therapy in Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands from the third-party payers' perspective. Using a decision tree model, the cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic therapy was analysed by extrapolating data from the European Haemophilia Economic Study to a 1-year analytic time horizon. Five hundred and six patients with severe haemophilia A and B, without inhibitors and at least 14 years of age, were enrolled in this study. Patients treated prophylactically had fewer bleeds than patients treated on-demand. With prophylactic treatment, the incremental cost per avoided bleeding ranged from [Euro... (More)
The aim of this study was to assess the incremental cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic haemophilia therapy in Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands from the third-party payers' perspective. Using a decision tree model, the cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic therapy was analysed by extrapolating data from the European Haemophilia Economic Study to a 1-year analytic time horizon. Five hundred and six patients with severe haemophilia A and B, without inhibitors and at least 14 years of age, were enrolled in this study. Patients treated prophylactically had fewer bleeds than patients treated on-demand. With prophylactic treatment, the incremental cost per avoided bleeding ranged from [Euro sign]6650 for patients 30 years of age or younger in Germany to [Euro sign]14 140 for patients over 30 years old in Sweden. If quality of life was taken into account, patients receiving prophylactic treatment had higher mean utilities than patients on on-demand therapy. The incremental effectiveness ratios in Germany were [Euro sign]1.2 million per quality-adjusted life year gained for patients 30 years or younger and HIV-positive and [Euro sign]2.2 million for patients 30 years or younger and HIV-negative. In the group aged over 30 years and HIV-positive the on-demand treatment strategy was dominant, whereas in the over 30 years/HIV-negative group the incremental cost-utility ratio was [Euro sign]4.7 million per quality-adjusted life year. Based on our decision analysis, the use of prophylactic treatment was overall more effective than on-demand therapy in young haemophiliacs, but at extremely high cost. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
volume
16
issue
7
pages
477 - 485
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000232789300004
  • pmid:16175006
  • scopus:29144528724
ISSN
1473-5733
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
92ad9ecb-d615-4845-88bc-6f9fb6c19c11 (old id 143553)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16175006&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-17 09:37:42
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:44:52
@article{92ad9ecb-d615-4845-88bc-6f9fb6c19c11,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to assess the incremental cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic haemophilia therapy in Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands from the third-party payers' perspective. Using a decision tree model, the cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic therapy was analysed by extrapolating data from the European Haemophilia Economic Study to a 1-year analytic time horizon. Five hundred and six patients with severe haemophilia A and B, without inhibitors and at least 14 years of age, were enrolled in this study. Patients treated prophylactically had fewer bleeds than patients treated on-demand. With prophylactic treatment, the incremental cost per avoided bleeding ranged from [Euro sign]6650 for patients 30 years of age or younger in Germany to [Euro sign]14 140 for patients over 30 years old in Sweden. If quality of life was taken into account, patients receiving prophylactic treatment had higher mean utilities than patients on on-demand therapy. The incremental effectiveness ratios in Germany were [Euro sign]1.2 million per quality-adjusted life year gained for patients 30 years or younger and HIV-positive and [Euro sign]2.2 million for patients 30 years or younger and HIV-negative. In the group aged over 30 years and HIV-positive the on-demand treatment strategy was dominant, whereas in the over 30 years/HIV-negative group the incremental cost-utility ratio was [Euro sign]4.7 million per quality-adjusted life year. Based on our decision analysis, the use of prophylactic treatment was overall more effective than on-demand therapy in young haemophiliacs, but at extremely high cost.},
  author       = {Lippert, Barbara and Berger, Karin and Berntorp, Erik and Giangrande, Paul and van den Berg, Marijke and Schramm, Wolfgang and Siebert, Uwe},
  issn         = {1473-5733},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {477--485},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams and Wilkins},
  series       = {Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis},
  title        = {Cost effectiveness of haemophilia treatment: a cross-national assessment.},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2005},
}