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Joint outcomes in patients with haemophilia: the importance of adherence to preventive regimens.

Berntorp, Erik LU (2009) In Haemophilia 15. p.1219-1227
Abstract
In patients with severe haemophilia, spontaneous bleeding into joints initiates a sequence of events culminating in disabling arthropathy. Early evidence from Sweden suggested that clotting factor prophylaxis improved patient outcomes. Recent randomized, controlled trials comparing prophylaxis with on-demand treatment have definitively shown that prophylaxis reduces bleeding and improves joint outcomes in patients with severe haemophilia A. Available evidence also supports the effectiveness of prophylaxis in patients with haemophilia B. In the United States, fewer than half of all patients with severe haemophilia A or B are treated with prophylaxis, and in those receiving such treatment, adherence to prophylactic treatment regimens is low... (More)
In patients with severe haemophilia, spontaneous bleeding into joints initiates a sequence of events culminating in disabling arthropathy. Early evidence from Sweden suggested that clotting factor prophylaxis improved patient outcomes. Recent randomized, controlled trials comparing prophylaxis with on-demand treatment have definitively shown that prophylaxis reduces bleeding and improves joint outcomes in patients with severe haemophilia A. Available evidence also supports the effectiveness of prophylaxis in patients with haemophilia B. In the United States, fewer than half of all patients with severe haemophilia A or B are treated with prophylaxis, and in those receiving such treatment, adherence to prophylactic treatment regimens is low in many age groups. Barriers to prophylaxis include cost, difficulties associated with venous access and the time required for prophylactic infusions. Although concerns around adherence play an important role in the willingness of physicians to prescribe prophylaxis, individualized prophylactic regimens may help increase patient adherence. Clotting factors that are more convenient and less time-consuming to infuse also may improve adherence to prophylactic therapy. By promoting rigorous adherence to prophylactic clotting factor therapies, physicians may be able to help preserve joint function in patients with severe haemophilia. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Haemophilia
volume
15
pages
1219 - 1227
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000271187500006
  • pmid:19659939
  • scopus:70449562279
ISSN
1351-8216
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2516.2009.02077.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e1428818-4cd6-4442-aa94-d4136f3c35bb (old id 1469962)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19659939?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-09-04 14:52:13
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:47:21
@article{e1428818-4cd6-4442-aa94-d4136f3c35bb,
  abstract     = {In patients with severe haemophilia, spontaneous bleeding into joints initiates a sequence of events culminating in disabling arthropathy. Early evidence from Sweden suggested that clotting factor prophylaxis improved patient outcomes. Recent randomized, controlled trials comparing prophylaxis with on-demand treatment have definitively shown that prophylaxis reduces bleeding and improves joint outcomes in patients with severe haemophilia A. Available evidence also supports the effectiveness of prophylaxis in patients with haemophilia B. In the United States, fewer than half of all patients with severe haemophilia A or B are treated with prophylaxis, and in those receiving such treatment, adherence to prophylactic treatment regimens is low in many age groups. Barriers to prophylaxis include cost, difficulties associated with venous access and the time required for prophylactic infusions. Although concerns around adherence play an important role in the willingness of physicians to prescribe prophylaxis, individualized prophylactic regimens may help increase patient adherence. Clotting factors that are more convenient and less time-consuming to infuse also may improve adherence to prophylactic therapy. By promoting rigorous adherence to prophylactic clotting factor therapies, physicians may be able to help preserve joint function in patients with severe haemophilia.},
  author       = {Berntorp, Erik},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1219--1227},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {Joint outcomes in patients with haemophilia: the importance of adherence to preventive regimens.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2516.2009.02077.x},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2009},
}