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Resistance of flight feathers to mechanical fatigue covaries with moult strategy in two warbler species

Weber, Thomas LU ; Borgudd, J; Hedenström, Anders LU ; Persson, Kent LU and Sandberg, Göran LU (2005) In Biology Letters 1(1). p.27-30
Abstract
Flight feather moult in small passerines is realized in several ways. Some species moult once after breeding or once on their wintering grounds; others even moult twice. The adaptive significance of this diversity is still largely unknown. We compared the resistance to mechanical fatigue of flight feathers from the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migratory species moulting once on its breeding grounds, with feathers from the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species moulting in both its breeding and wintering grounds. We found that flight feathers of willow warblers, which have a shaft with a comparatively large diameter, become fatigued much faster than feathers of chiffchaffs under an artificial cyclic bending... (More)
Flight feather moult in small passerines is realized in several ways. Some species moult once after breeding or once on their wintering grounds; others even moult twice. The adaptive significance of this diversity is still largely unknown. We compared the resistance to mechanical fatigue of flight feathers from the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migratory species moulting once on its breeding grounds, with feathers from the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species moulting in both its breeding and wintering grounds. We found that flight feathers of willow warblers, which have a shaft with a comparatively large diameter, become fatigued much faster than feathers of chiffchaffs under an artificial cyclic bending regime. We propose that willow warblers may strengthen their flight feathers by increasing the diameter of the shaft, which may lead to a more rapid accumulation of damage in willow warblers than in chiffchaffs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biology Letters
volume
1
issue
1
pages
27 - 30
publisher
Royal Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000232135300008
  • scopus:27444442787
ISSN
1744-9561
DOI
10.1098/rsbl.2004.0244
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9f381a40-3939-4808-a49a-2c31217f225d (old id 147382)
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 15:55:56
date last changed
2017-01-15 03:42:32
@article{9f381a40-3939-4808-a49a-2c31217f225d,
  abstract     = {Flight feather moult in small passerines is realized in several ways. Some species moult once after breeding or once on their wintering grounds; others even moult twice. The adaptive significance of this diversity is still largely unknown. We compared the resistance to mechanical fatigue of flight feathers from the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migratory species moulting once on its breeding grounds, with feathers from the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species moulting in both its breeding and wintering grounds. We found that flight feathers of willow warblers, which have a shaft with a comparatively large diameter, become fatigued much faster than feathers of chiffchaffs under an artificial cyclic bending regime. We propose that willow warblers may strengthen their flight feathers by increasing the diameter of the shaft, which may lead to a more rapid accumulation of damage in willow warblers than in chiffchaffs.},
  author       = {Weber, Thomas and Borgudd, J and Hedenström, Anders and Persson, Kent and Sandberg, Göran},
  issn         = {1744-9561},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {27--30},
  publisher    = {Royal Society},
  series       = {Biology Letters},
  title        = {Resistance of flight feathers to mechanical fatigue covaries with moult strategy in two warbler species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2004.0244},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2005},
}