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Toxicity and Dose Response of Intra-Abdominally Administered Poly-L-alpha-Lysine and Poly-L-Glutamate for Postoperative Adhesion Protection.

Isaksson, Karolin LU ; Åkerberg, Daniel LU ; Andersson, Roland LU and Tingstedt, Bobby LU (2010) In European Surgical Research 44(1). p.17-22
Abstract
Background/Aims: Two differently charged polypeptides, poly-L-lysine (PL) and poly-L-glutamate (PG), have previously been shown to reduce postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. This study aims to investigate the possible toxic effects and to establish a lowest effective antiadhesive dose. Methods: 152 mice were investigated with a well-known adhesion model and given different concentrations of the two differently charged polypeptides as well as only the cationic PL. Results: For the first time, a probable toxic level of PL given intraperitoneally (40 mg/kg) and the lowest significant concentration of PL and PG for antiadhesive purposes (1.6 mg/kg) could be established. Conclusion: The gap between the possible toxicity level of PL and the... (More)
Background/Aims: Two differently charged polypeptides, poly-L-lysine (PL) and poly-L-glutamate (PG), have previously been shown to reduce postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. This study aims to investigate the possible toxic effects and to establish a lowest effective antiadhesive dose. Methods: 152 mice were investigated with a well-known adhesion model and given different concentrations of the two differently charged polypeptides as well as only the cationic PL. Results: For the first time, a probable toxic level of PL given intraperitoneally (40 mg/kg) and the lowest significant concentration of PL and PG for antiadhesive purposes (1.6 mg/kg) could be established. Conclusion: The gap between the possible toxicity level of PL and the lowest efficient antiadhesive dose is probably too narrow, and the shape and charge of PL warrant continuous research for another polycation in the concept of differently charged polypeptides used as antiadhesive agents. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Surgical Research
volume
44
issue
1
pages
17 - 22
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000272599800003
  • pmid:19923842
  • scopus:70449623640
ISSN
0014-312X
DOI
10.1159/000258654
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6bf189aa-3d47-44c0-b37f-b272f9f80a85 (old id 1511776)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19923842?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-12-04 14:39:19
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:13:47
@article{6bf189aa-3d47-44c0-b37f-b272f9f80a85,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: Two differently charged polypeptides, poly-L-lysine (PL) and poly-L-glutamate (PG), have previously been shown to reduce postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. This study aims to investigate the possible toxic effects and to establish a lowest effective antiadhesive dose. Methods: 152 mice were investigated with a well-known adhesion model and given different concentrations of the two differently charged polypeptides as well as only the cationic PL. Results: For the first time, a probable toxic level of PL given intraperitoneally (40 mg/kg) and the lowest significant concentration of PL and PG for antiadhesive purposes (1.6 mg/kg) could be established. Conclusion: The gap between the possible toxicity level of PL and the lowest efficient antiadhesive dose is probably too narrow, and the shape and charge of PL warrant continuous research for another polycation in the concept of differently charged polypeptides used as antiadhesive agents.},
  author       = {Isaksson, Karolin and Åkerberg, Daniel and Andersson, Roland and Tingstedt, Bobby},
  issn         = {0014-312X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {17--22},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {European Surgical Research},
  title        = {Toxicity and Dose Response of Intra-Abdominally Administered Poly-L-alpha-Lysine and Poly-L-Glutamate for Postoperative Adhesion Protection.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000258654},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2010},
}